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Community News Archives for 2022-12

Cover Crop Premium Discount Program available in White River Region counties

The Indiana State Department of Agriculture, The Nature Conservancy and the United States Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency have joined forces to implement the Cover Crop Premium Discount Program for the third year in a row.

 

This program rewards farmers who plant cover crops by providing a reduced premium on their crop insurance. The discount program was designed to promote planting additional acres of cover crops that are not covered by other state or federal incentives.

 

Over the last year, this program has had great success with 55 farmers participating, translating to more than 15,000 acres of cover crops on Indiana farmland in the watershed.

 

This program will provide farmers with a unique opportunity to receive financial incentives for implementing cover crops on their operation. Farmers who plant cover crops on owned or rented acres will receive a $5 per acre crop insurance premium discount. Farmers who planted cover crops in the fall of 2022 are eligible to apply.

 

Qualifying counties in the White River area include Bartholomew, Boone, Brown, Clark, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, Delaware, Floyd, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Harrison, Hendricks, Henry, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Ohio, Orange, Randolph, Ripley, Scott, Shelby, Switzerland, Tipton and Washington.

DNR hosting First Day Hikes to kick off the new year

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources on New Year’s Day is hosting its First Day Hike.

 

On Jan. 1, 2023, Indiana state parks and state forests are hosting guided hikes, runs and one trail ride.

 

Find a hike for you at bit.ly/2023-first-day-hikes.

 

• Brookville Lake (Mounds SRA), Hike, 4p ET

• Brown County State Park, Ride Along, 11a ET; Hike, 11a ET

• Chain O'Lakes State Park, Hike, 11a ET

• Charlestown State Park, Hike, 10a ET

• Clark State Forest, Hike, 1p ET

• Clifty Falls State Park, Hike, 1p ET

• Falls of the Ohio State Park, Hike, 1p ET

• Fort Harrison State Park, Hike, 1p ET

• Ferdinand State Forest, Hike, 9a ET

• Greene-Sullivan State Forest, Hike, 8a ET

• Harmonie State Park, Hike, 1p CT,

• Indiana Dunes State Park, Hike, 10a CT

• Jackson-Washington State Forest, Hike, 9a ET

• Lincoln State Park, Hike, Noon CT

• Martin State Forest, Hike, 10a ET

• McCormick's Creek State Park, Hike, 1p ET

• Monroe Lake (Fairfax SRA), Run and Walk, 3:30p ET

• Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Hike, 8a ET

• Walk with an Ox, O'Bannon Woods State Park, 10a ET

• Ouabache State Park, Night Hike, 5:30p ET

• Owen-Putnam State Forest, Hike, 8a ET

• Patoka Lake, Hike, Noon ET

• Pokagon State Park, Hike, 2p ET

• Potato Creek State Park, Hike, 2p ET

• Prophetstown State Park, Hike, 1p ET

• Raccoon SRA (Cecil M Harden Lake), Hike, 1p ET

• Salamonie River State Forest, Hike, 3p ET

• Shakamak State Park, Hikes, 10a and 1p ET

• Spring Mill State Park, Long Hike, 9a ET, Short Hike; 9:30a ET

• Summit Lake State Park, Hike, 9a ET

• Versailles State Park, Hike, Noon ET

• Whitewater Memorial State Park, Hike, 2p ET

• Yellowwood State Forest, Hike, 4p ET

 

 

Target and U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recalls weighted blankets following two deaths

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Target Corporation are announcing the recall of about 204,000 Pillowfort Weighted Blankets, where a young child can become entrapped by unzipping and entering the blanket, posing a risk of death by asphyxiation.

 

A 4-year-old girl and a 6-year-old girl reportedly became entrapped in the cover of the weighted blanket and died due to asphyxia at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in April 2022.

 

Target has received four reports of children becoming entrapped in these weighted blankets, including the two fatalities.

 

CPSC and Target are urging consumers to stop using the recalled weighted blankets immediately and contact Target for a refund.

 

This recall involves Pillowfort Weighted Blankets.  The blankets weigh 6 pounds, measure 60 inches long and 40 inches wide and have a removable, waterproof, washable cover. The blankets come in eight prints or colors including unicorn white, space navy, pink, blue, gray, buffalo plaid red, blue constellation, and unicorn pink.

 

Item numbers 097-02-0140 (Unicorn - White), 097-02-0148 (Space Navy), 097-02-0361(Pink), 097-02-0363 (Blue), 097-02-0364 (Gray), 097-02-1603 (Buffalo Plaid – Red), 097-02-3904 (Blue Constellation) and 097-02-3905 (Unicorn – Pink) are printed on the fabric tag attached to the removable covers of the blankets.

 

The weighted blankets were manufactured in China.

 

Target exclusively sold the recalled weighted blankets at Target stores nationwide and online at www.target.com. The blankets were sold from December 2018 through September 2022 for $40.

 

Contact Target at 800-440-0680 from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT daily to receive a prepaid return label to return the blankets by mail or return to any Target store. Go online at https://help.target.com/help/RedirectArticleToDetail?articleId=kA95d000000sY5c&clickSearchVar=Search+Results&searchQuery=Recalled%3A%20Target%20Childrens%20Pillowfort%20Weighted%20Blankets&articleTitle=Target+Childrens+Pillowfort+Weighted+Blankets or www.target.com and click on “Recall Information”, then on “Home Goods” for more information.

 

Target is also contacting all known purchasers directly to arrange returns. The consumer will receive a refund of $40 in the form of a credit for use at Target stores or online at www.target.com, or the amount on the purchase receipt if higher. Consumers can also click the “Products Recalls” tab on Target’s Facebook page for more information.

 

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Saver's Credit higher limits can help low- and moderate-income workers save more in 2023

The Internal Revenue Service reminds low- and moderate-income workers that they can save for retirement now and possibly earn a special tax credit in 2022 and years ahead.

 

The Retirement Savings Contributions Credit, also known as the Saver’s Credit, helps offset part of the first $2,000 workers voluntarily contribute to Individual Retirement Arrangements, 401(k) plans and similar workplace retirement programs. The credit also helps any eligible person with a disability who is the designated beneficiary of an Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) account, contribute to that account. For more information about ABLE accounts, see Publication 907, available on IRS.gov.

 

The Saver’s Credit is available in addition to any other tax savings that apply.

 

Still time to take action

Eligible workers still have time to make qualifying retirement contributions and get the Saver’s Credit on their 2022 tax return. People have until April 18, 2023 - the due date for filing their 2022 return - to set up a new IRA or add money to an existing IRA for 2022. Both Roth and traditional IRAs qualify.

 

On the other hand, those participating in workplace retirement plans must take action by the end of 2022 for contributions to count for this year. This means elective deferrals (contributions) must be made by December 31 to a:

 

  • 401(k) plan.
  • 403(b) plan for employees of public schools and certain tax-exempt organizations.
  • Governmental 457 plan for state or local government employees.
  • Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) for federal employees.

 

Contributions to certain other workplace retirement plans also qualify. See the instructions to Form 8880 for details.

 

Employees unable to set aside money this year may want to schedule their 2023 contributions soon so their employer can begin withholding them in January.

 

Who qualifies

Income limits, based on a taxpayer’s adjusted gross income and marital or filing status, apply to the Saver’s Credit. But due to inflation, the limits will increase markedly in 2023.

 

As a result, the Saver’s Credit can be claimed by:

 

  • Married couples filing jointly with incomes up to $68,000 in 2022 or $73,000 in 2023.
     
  • Heads of household with incomes up to $51,000 in 2022 or $54,750 in 2023.
     
  • Married individuals filing separately and singles with incomes up to $34,000 in 2022 or $36,500 in 2023.

 

Like other tax credits, the Saver’s Credit can increase a taxpayer’s refund or reduce the tax owed. Though the maximum Saver’s Credit is $1,000 ($2,000 for married couples), the IRS cautioned that it is often much less and, due in part to the impact of other deductions and credits, may, in fact, be zero for some taxpayers.

 

A taxpayer’s credit amount is based on their filing status, adjusted gross income, tax liability and amount contributed to qualifying retirement programs or ABLE accounts. Form 8880 is used to claim the Saver’s Credit, and its instructions have details on figuring the credit correctly.

 

In tax year 2020, the most recent year for which complete figures are available, Saver’s Credits totaling more than $1.7 billion were claimed on about 9.4 million individual income tax returns. That’s an average of about $186 per eligible return.

 

The Saver’s Credit supplements other tax benefits available to people who set money aside for retirement. For example, most workers may deduct their contributions to a traditional IRA. Though Roth IRA contributions are not deductible, qualifying withdrawals, usually after retirement, are tax-free. Normally, contributions to 401(k) and similar workplace plans are not taxed until withdrawn.

 

Some restrictions apply

Other special rules that apply to the Saver’s Credit include:

 

  • Eligible taxpayers must be at least 18 years of age.

 

  • Anyone claimed as a dependent on someone else’s return cannot take the credit.

 

  • A student cannot take the credit. A person enrolled as a full-time student during any part of 5 calendar months during the year is considered a student.

Any distributions from a retirement plan or ABLE account reduce the contribution amount used to figure the credit. For 2022, this rule applies to distributions received after 2019 and before the due date, including extensions, of the 2022 return. Form 8880 and its instructions have details on making this computation.

 

To learn more about other ways to get ready for the tax season ahead, visit IRS.gov/getready

 

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Update: Change to Shelbyville holiday trash schedule due to Friday's cold temps

The Shelbyville Street Department is delaying trash pick up for this Friday due to frigid temperatures.

 

The following trash schedule will now be in place:

 

Friday, December 23 - NO trash or recycling will be collected. Recycling will be delayed until Friday, Dec 30. Trash will be collected on Monday, Dec 26. 

 

Monday, December 26 – Friday's trash will be collected on Monday. The department will also pick up Monday's recycling. Monday’s trash will be collected on Tuesday along with Tuesday’s trash and recycle.

 

Monday, January 2 - No trash or recycling will be collected.  Monday’s trash will be collected on Tuesday along with Tuesday’s trash and recycle. Monday's recycling will be delayed until the following Monday.

 

Residents are reminded to have their trash out by 7 a.m. as the street department will be running extra trucks and times will vary from usual trash collection.

 

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Shelbyville Street Department announces holiday trash schedule

The Shelbyville Street Department will run on the following dates for the holiday trash schedule:

 

Friday, December 23 - Will be a normal collection day for trash and recycle.  

 

Monday, December 26 – Recycle only will be collected on Monday. Monday’s trash will be collected on Tuesday along with Tuesday’s trash and recycle.

 

Monday, January 2 - No trash or recycling will be collected.  Monday’s trash will be collected on Tuesday along with Tuesday’s trash and recycle. Monday's recycling will be delayed until the following Monday.

 

Residents are reminded, especially on these days, to have their trash out by 7 a.m. as the department will be running extra trucks and times will vary from usual trash collection.

 

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Donation made to HVAF from Veteran's Day event at Horseshoe Indianapolis

Horseshoe Indianapolis made a delivery to Helping Veterans and Families of Indiana (HVAF) Friday, December 16 from the special Veteran’s Day event held during live racing.

 

A special Veteran’s Day Challenge Handicapping Contest was held featuring 11 top handicappers from across the nation who placed wagers on the Pick 5. A total of $1,517.50 was raised through the promotion along with the delivery of 210 pounds of peanut butter collected by the jockeys at Horseshoe Indianapolis.

 

“Serving the veterans in our area has become an annual focal point for us and HVAF does a tremendous job in reaching and aiding those who have served our country,” said Eric Halstrom, Vice President and General Manager of Racing. “This is the second year we have held the special Veteran’s Day event featuring the Pick 5. Handicappers are more than willing to donate their time to assist us in supporting such a worthy cause.”

 

The Pick 5 Challenge included Steve Byk of “At the Races” Sirius Radio Show, Nick Hines, former veteran known as “Sarge” and Matt Carothers of Fanduel TV, Sara Elbadwi and Ed DeRosa of Horse Racing Nation, Gene McLean of “The Pressbox” podcast, Ellis Starr of Equibase, Anthony Stabile of New York Racing Association (NYRA) Bets, Scott Ehlers of Daily Racing Form, Dan Tordjman of America’s Best Racing, and Louis Rabaut of Horseplayers Now/Green Sheet. Each handicapper placed a $250 wager, courtesy of Horseshoe Indianapolis, on the Pick 5 Friday, Nov. 11. Byk, Ehlers, Starr, McLean, and Rabaut hit the wager for $252 each totaling $1,517.50. All proceeds were earmarked to HVAF.

 

“We are currently serving 250 veterans per month from our food pantry,” said Ashlee Walls-Pierce, Vice President for Advancement. “We have served 1,230 veterans through November and distributed 56,000 pounds of food, clothing, and personal hygiene items through our pantry. We serve any veteran in our pantry and are gearing up for our organization’s 30th anniversary next year.”

 

Walls noted peanut butter and canned meat are the two most requested items from the pantry. The headquarters are located in downtown Indianapolis with a total of 18 different housing properties managed by HVAF scattered around the area.

 

“In addition to our pantry, we have more than 350 individuals from our Christmas Outreach program receiving special Christmas items this year,” added Andrea Carlile, Community Engagement Coordinator. “Donations were made to these veterans and their families for needed items on special lists they submitted to us. Items ranged from pots and pans to a bicycle. Homelessness for veterans has gone down 35 percent over last year. During Covid it increased by 16 percent. A lot of our programs are preventative, so we are glad to see those percentages trending down.”

 

HVAF of Indiana, Inc. is the largest non-profit for veterans in the state of Indiana. They work tirelessly to end homelessness among veterans, offering additional solutions such as housing and re-integration services to prevent at-risk veterans from reaching that stage. For more information or to donate, visit the website at: www.hvafofindiana.org.

 

The 21st season of live Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing resumes Tuesday, April 18 and concludes Friday, Nov. 17. Racing will be held during the week beginning at 2:30 p.m. Monday through Wednesday with Thursday post times set at 2:10 p.m. Saturday racing will be offered on 16 dates in 2023 with six of those dates reserved for all-Quarter Horse action.

 

For more information on live racing at Horseshoe Indianapolis, visit www.caesars.com/horseshoe-indianapolis.

Morristown Elementary School is wanting to teach kids how to ride a bike in PE Class

The All Kids Bike Kindergarten Learn-to-Ride Program is a 24-fleet of bikes, pedal conversion kits, helmets, one teacher instruction bike, and certified curriculum teacher training, which is everything they will need to teach kids how to progress from balance to riding a bike in 8 lessons at Morristown Elementary School.

 

Lisa Weyer, Executive Director of the Strider Education Foundation explains, “The ability to ride a bike develops physical and mental well-being and instills confidence which can lead to better focus in the classroom.  Kindergarten is the perfect age to teach kids to ride a bike focusing on gross motor skills, balance, and coordination.  By teaching bike riding at the entry-level in a public school system, we are providing the knowledge and a positive foundation of a lifelong skill.”  

 

At Morristown Elementary School this program will teach approximately 45 kindergarten students how to ride a bike on an annual basis.  With the equipment lifespan of 7-10 years, this will impact up to 450 kids over the next decade.

 

To learn more about the program or make a donation, please visit: https://stridereducationfoundation-bloom.kindful.com/morristown-elementary-school-2022/morristown-elementary-school

Shelby Co. culvert to be replaced on Edinburgh Road

Beginning Tuesday, December 20, Trisler Construction, a contractor for the Shelby County Highway Department, will be closing Edinburgh Road to replace Culvert JAC-99 which is located between the intersections of S 600 W / W 700 S.

 

The road will be closed for 4 – 6 weeks depending on weather and material availability.

 

The last addresses accessible from the northeast are 7410 and 7416 S Edinburgh Road.

 

The last addresses accessible from the southwest are 7445 and 7456 S Edinburgh Road.

Storm drain repair next week on Shelbyville's Rolling Ridge Road

The Shelbyville Street Department says a storm drain will be replaced next week on Rolling Ridge Road.

 

Rolling Ridge Road will be closed from Fountain Lake Drive East to Crest Drive. All residents will be able to access their homes. Residents on Crest Drive will need to come in from the east. 

 

Closure dates / times, weather permitting: December 19-22 during the hours of 8 a.m. -3:30 p.m.

 

Water main repair closes Shelbyville street Wednesday - Thursday

Dave O'Mara, contractor for Indiana American Water, will be replacing a water main on Shelbyville's Tompkins Street.

 

Tompkins will be closed from South Street to the first alley south of the intersection.  The street will be completely closed beginning Wednesday, December 14, at 8:30 a.m. and reopening Thursday, December 15, at 12 p.m.

Rose-Hulman's 'AskRose' Math & Science tutoring program expands early evening hours

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology’s free AskRose Homework Help program has expanded its early-evening hours, starting at 5 p.m. five nights each week, to provide increased opportunities for middle and high school students to get help with their math and science homework.

 

Rose-Hulman tutors are now available Sunday through Thursday from 5-10 p.m. (Eastern Time) for tutoring sessions to help students in grades 6 through 12 by video, telephone call, email, or chat. Tutors can be accessed via the AskRose website, AskRose.org, or by calling 877-ASK-ROSE (877-275-7673).

 

AskRose officials acknowledge that the COVID-19 pandemic has had students turning to online instruction, especially digital technology, and more families are choosing online and home schooling options. At the same time, the in-school educational landscape has changed, because of student and educator absences, with some math and science materials not being covered. This has caused educational gaps within younger students.

 

“This new learning landscape, coupled with COVID learning loss, means the personalized tutoring services provided by our AskRose Homework Help program is needed now more than ever. We’re happy to help these students be better learners in the classroom and gain the math and science skills necessary to develop the well-trained workforce for the future,” said Rose-Hulman President Robert A. Coons, a member of the Governor Holcomb’s Workforce Cabinet. The panel has made recommendations to tackle employer talent challenges and accelerate Indiana’s economy by strengthening the educator pipeline in subjects related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

 

AskRose Homework Help has conducted more than 750,000 tutoring sessions since starting in 1991. The AskRose.org website also offers more than 500 resources available through videos and downloadable reference materials.

 

About 100 Rose-Hulman students serve as tutors during each school year after being specially recommended by faculty for their technical knowledge and ability to communicate with students of all skill and comprehension levels. Approximately 20 tutors are available each night and they have access to textbooks and many other resources to lend valuable assistance. The AskRose Homework Help program is certified by the National Tutoring Association.

 

Rather than give students the answers, AskRose tutors guide students through homework problems to help them better understand math and science concepts, the way they are taught in schools today.  

 

Student privacy is always protected, and students are never asked for their last name or telephone number.

 

All AskRose Homework Help services are available at no cost to students and parents through support and financial assistance from Lilly Endowment Inc. and Rose-Hulman.

 

AskRose Basics:

- Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology offers free math and science tutoring for students in grades 6-12. Students may call 877-ASK-ROSE (877-275-7673) to speak with a tutor, or go to the AskRose website, AskRose.org, to interact with a tutor by video, online or through email. Questions filed by email and other means are answered during AskRose’s hours of operation.

- Hours of operation: 5-10 p.m. (EDT), Sunday through Thursday, through May. Additional afternoon hours may be available, depending on tutor availability. (The service is closed during Rose-Hulman’s holiday breaks.)

- Online resources: Students and educators may access resources and educational materials at AskRose.org.

- Sponsors: The service is supported by Lilly Endowment Inc. and Rose-Hulman.

Cover Crop Premium Discount Program available in White River Region counties - Shelby and Hancock

The Indiana State Department of Agriculture, The Nature Conservancy and the United State Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency have joined forces to implement the Cover Crop Premium Discount Program for the third year in a row.

 

This program, which mirrors efforts in Iowa and Illinois, will reward farmers who plant cover crops by providing a reduced premium on their crop insurance. The discount program was designed to promote planting additional acres of cover crops that are not covered by other state or federal incentives. This program is eligible for counties in central and southern Indiana’s White River region.

 

“Providing nutrients and needed ground cover to soil, cover crops are unmatched in the benefits they provide to soil structure,” said Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch, who also serves as Secretary of Agriculture and Rural Development. “Implementing cover crops, however, can be expensive. So, I am excited this program will once again give farmers an opportunity to increase their cover cropped acreage, which will improve water quality and enhance soil structure in our state.”

 

Over the last year, this program has had great success with 55 farmers participating, translating to more than 15,000 acres of cover crops on Indiana farmland in the watershed.

 

This program will provide farmers with a unique opportunity to receive financial incentives for implementing cover crops on their operation. Farmers who plant cover crops on owned or rented acres will receive a $5 per acre crop insurance premium discount. Farmers who planted cover crops in the fall of 2022 are eligible to apply.

 

Qualifying counties in the White River area include Bartholomew, Boone, Brown, Clark, Crawford, Daviess, Dearborn, Decatur, Delaware, Floyd, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Harrison, Hendricks, Henry, Jackson, Jefferson, Jennings, Johnson, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Martin, Monroe, Morgan, Ohio, Orange, Randolph, Ripley, Scott, Shelby, Switzerland, Tipton and Washington.

 

Cover cropping has many benefits including increased organic matter, improved soil biology as well as better water infiltration and water-holding capacity. This practice also prevents nutrients and sediment from running off the farm, keeping them out of nearby waterbodies and streams. Hoosier farmers planted 1.5 million acres of living covers in 2021 and, apart from corn and soybeans, are planted on more acres than any other commodity crop in Indiana.

 

“The Nature Conservancy is thrilled to continue this partnership that delivers a unique reward to farmers for adopting cover crops,” said Larry Clemens, Indiana State Director of The Nature Conservancy. “Last year, Indiana farmers helped the state lead the nation in soil health practices by planting over 1.5 million acres of cover crops. This program was instrumental in that achievement, and we will take that success to new portions of the state this year.”

 

Bruce Kettler, director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture, encourages farmers to learn more about this program if they farm in central and southern Indiana’s White River region.

 

“Hoosier farmers are tremendous stewards of the land and take pride in protecting their natural resources,” said Kettler. “This program, made possible by our many partnerships, is an incredible value to the farmers in central and southern Indiana, and I am hopeful many will jump on this opportunity.”

 

Seeding of cover crops must follow best agronomic practices in terms of appropriate seeding rates, seed mixes and seeding dates to ensure objectives of the cover crop are being met. To ensure the practice provides the best results termination must be completed in the spring.

 

Funding for this program is provided by the Nina Mason Pulliam Charitable Trust, Cummins Foundation, and CenterPoint Energy Foundation. These three foundations are supporting The Nature Conservancy to improve water quality across Indiana and the Mississippi River Basin.

 

Applications are due March 15, 2023. Learn more and apply here or visit isda.in.gov.

Applications available for Indiana Senate Page Program

The Indiana Senate is now accepting applications for the 2023 Senate Page Program, said State Sen. Michael Crider (R-Greenfield).

 

Through the full-day program, students in grades six through 12 tour Indiana’s Statehouse, listen to debates and help staff with age-appropriate tasks. Students also have the opportunity to meet their state senator.

 

“The Senate Page Program is a great opportunity for young Hoosiers to experience the state legislative process firsthand," Crider said. "Welcoming students to the statehouse is something I look forward to every year and I hope to see many from our local community take advantage of this excellent program."

 

The Senate Page Program will begin in January and run through early April. Positions fill quickly, so it is important to apply early. Pages are scheduled for Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays during the legislative session. They begin their day at 8:30 a.m. and are dismissed at 3:30 p.m. Groups serve together on Wednesdays. Serving as a page is considered an excused absence from school.

 

For more information or to apply, visit www.IndianaSenateRepublicans.com/page-program.

 

 

Public hearing to be held Dec. 15 for proposed S.R. 244 roadway rehabilitation

The Indiana Department of Transportation announces a public hearing will be held Thursday, December 15, for the proposed S.R. 244 Roadway Rehabilitation Project.

 

This project location crosses through Rush and Shelby Counties.

 

The hearing will be held at Waldron Junior/Senior High School (102 East St., Waldron, IN 46182). The presentation is set to begin at 6 p.m.. An information open house session will follow, providing community members an opportunity to view exhibits and displays, as well as interact with the project team. 

 

The purpose of the proposed project is to improve the roadway conditions, update the roadway and safety features and to address repeated maintenance concerns along the corridor. 

 

Additionally, the public hearing presentation and exhibits will be posted online. INDOT respectfully asks that all comments be submitted by Thursday, December 29. 

Indiana DOR reminds nonprofits about upcoming tax changes

The Indiana Department of Revenue (DOR) wants to remind nonprofit organizations about changes to how they file their annual report with the agency and how they will access sales tax exemption certificates beginning next year. 

Earlier this year, Indiana General Assembly passed new legislation revising the filing frequency for Nonprofit Organization’s Annual Reports from annually to every five years.  

After 2022, the due date for the new Form NP-20R, Nonprofit Organization’s Report, is based on the last two digits of the organization’s federal employer identification number (FEIN). Form NP-20R will be due on: 

  • May 15, 2024, if the organization does not have a FEIN or if the organization’s FEIN ends in 00 through 24. 
  • May 15, 2025, if the organization’s FEIN ends in 25 through 49. 
  • May 15, 2026, if the organization’s FEIN ends in 50 through 74. 
  • May 15, 2027, if the organization’s FEIN ends in 75 through 99. 

After the date shown above, nonprofit organizations must file Form NP-20R by May 15 every fifth year.  

Organizations will need to file a Nonprofit Organization’s Annual Report for tax year 2021 in 2022 to qualify for the new filing frequency. This also applies to fiscal year filers whose tax years end before Aug. 1, 2022. 

Note: Organizations will not need to file Form NP-20 in 2023 for the 2022 calendar year. In addition, fiscal year filers who file Form NP-20 for a fiscal year ending after July 31, 2022, will not need to file an NP-20 during the 2023 calendar year.

Nonprofits will still need to file Form IT-20NP, Indiana’s Nonprofit Organization Unrelated Business Income Tax Return, for each year in which the organization has unrelated business income (as defined under Internal Revenue Code Section 513) of $1,000 or more. 

Beginning Jan. 1, 2023, nonprofit organizations should no longer use Indiana General Sales Tax Exemption Certificate (Form ST-105). Nonprofits will be required to utilize Form NP-1, Nonprofit Sales Tax Exemption Certificates. These forms will be available only through DOR’s e-services portal, INTIME.

Nonprofit organizations not currently registered for the portal will need to register on INTIME to create and access their exemption certificates as of Jan. 1. Instructions on creating an INTIME logon are available in the INTIME User Guide, available at intime.dor.in.gov. 

DOR also reminds nonprofit organizations about the repeal of the “30-day rule” for fundraisers. Until July 1, 2022, qualifying fundraisers lasting less than 30 days were exempt from sales tax. Effective July 1, 2022, this rule was repealed and replaced with a different threshold. Once sales by a nonprofit organization reaches $20,000, the organization is now required to collect state gross retail tax on sales for the remainder of the calendar year. The new rule applies to all units operating under the organization’s nonprofit registration with DOR. 

 For more information, see the Nonprofit Tax Forms page or Sales Tax Information Bulletin #10 on DOR’s website, dor.in.gov.  

Purdue to again require SAT / ACT for admissions

Purdue University announced Tuesday that it will resume requiring SAT and / or ACT test scores for admissions applications, beginning with students who apply for Fall 2024 admission to Purdue.

 

The resumption was recommended by university administration and endorsed by the board of trustees.

 

Purdue is making the announcement now so that current high school juniors can register for and schedule their exams and submit the test results with their applications. Purdue will begin accepting 2024 applications on Aug. 1, 2023.

 

Purdue has been “test flexible” since 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which prevented many students from having access to a testing site. For the last two years, Purdue has recommended but not required the test scores, and nearly three-fourths of applicants have provided them. Purdue accepts SAT or ACT scores and has no preference on which test is taken. Students may report the best scores from across different tests on their admissions application.

 

“The evidence is clear that test scores provide essential information in a comprehensive admissions evaluation that enables us to ensure the optimal chance of success for each admitted student,” said Kris Wong Davis, Purdue vice provost for enrollment management.

 

In September 2022, Purdue announced an all-time enrollment record. For Fall 2022, the average new student had a 3.74 GPA, an average SAT total of 1317 and an average ACT composite of 29.8. For Fall 2022, 82.4% of admitted students submitted either an SAT or ACT score.

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