Community News

Health officials urge precautions against mosquitoes as rare virus is detected in northern Indiana

State health officials are urging Indiana residents to protect themselves from mosquito bites in response to the detection of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus activity in northern Indiana.

 

Since mid-August of this year, three horses and one group of mosquitoes from Elkhart County have tested positive for EEE virus. No human cases of EEE virus disease have been reported in Indiana in 2019; however, three human cases have been reported in southwest Michigan this year, one of which was fatal.

 

“EEE, or triple-E, virus is rare but extremely serious. It can cause long-term complications and even death,” said Jennifer Brown, D.V.M., M.P.H., state public health veterinarian at the Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH). “You can protect yourself from EEE virus and other viruses by taking steps to prevent mosquito bites whenever you spend time outdoors. You can also reduce the risk for yourself and your neighbors by eliminating mosquito breeding sites from your property.”

 

State health officials recommend the following preventive measures:

  • Avoid being outdoors when mosquitoes are active (especially late afternoon, dusk to dawn and early morning)
  • Use an EPA-registered insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on clothes and exposed skin
  • Cover exposed skin by wearing a hat, long sleeves and long pants in places where mosquitoes are especially active, such as wooded areas
  • Install or repair screens on windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out of your home

 

You can eliminate mosquito breeding sites from your property by doing the following:

  • Discard old tires, tin/aluminum cans, ceramic pots or other containers that can hold water
  • Repair failed septic systems
  • Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors
  • Keep grass cut short and shrubbery trimmed
  • Clean clogged roof gutters, particularly if leaves tend to plug up the drains
  • Frequently replace the water in pet bowls
  • Flush ornamental fountains and birdbaths periodically
  • Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with predatory fish

 

While rare, EEE virus can cause serious illness and has a fatality rate of about 33 percent in people. Many people who recover may still experience long-term complications. Symptoms of EEE virus disease include chills, fever, body aches and joint pain. Some people develop a more severe form of the disease that affects the nervous system and causes encephalitis (inflammation of the brain). People who are younger than 15 years and older than 50 years are at the greatest risk of severe disease if infected with EEE virus. People who think they may have EEE virus disease should see a healthcare provider.

 

To see the latest results of ISDH’s mosquito surveillance program, go to https://gis.in.gov/apps/ISDH/Arbo/. To learn more about EEE virus, visit the ISDH website at https://www.in.gov/isdh/28258.htm.

DAV, RecruitMilitary® host Cincinnati veteran career fair at Great American Ballpark

DAV (Disabled American Veterans) and RecruitMilitary® will co-host the Cincinnati Veterans Career Fair at Great American Ballpark Sept. 12 from 11 am to 3 pm. The event is free to veterans, their spouses, active-duty military personnel and members of the National Guard and Reserve.

 

More than 40 employers actively seeking the unique talents of America’s veterans will be on-site representing a range of industries, from construction to medical to administrative and logistics, with career opportunities from entry level to senior management. In addition to employment assistance, the 185-plus veterans expected to attend can utilize career counseling and resume assistance, network with fellow veterans and military personnel, and get support with their Department of Veterans Affairs benefits and claims assistance—all at no cost.

 

DAV sponsors more than 100 traditional and virtual career fairs each year. Since the inception of its employment initiative in 2014, there have been nearly 172,000 attendees and 132,000 job offers. Last year, to support employers, dispel myths and demonstrate the business case for employing America’s nearly 4 million veterans with a service-connected disability, DAV developed The Veteran Advantage: DAV Guide to Hiring and Retaining Veterans with Disabilities. This guide offers best practices and helpful tools for employers and strives to inspire more organizations to consider the veteran talent pool.

 

DAV’s National Employment Director Jeff Hall, a combat-injured Army veteran of the Persian Gulf War, is available to discuss trends in veteran and military spouse hiring, valuable employment-related resources and job opportunities in the Cincinnati area and nationwide. To arrange an interview, contact Jeff at 859-442-2055. 

   

To register for the Cincinnati All Veterans Career Fair and access additional no-cost resources for veterans and their families, go to jobs.dav.org.

Indiana health officials report first vaping-related death

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) has confirmed the first death of an Indiana resident due to severe lung injury linked to a history of e-cigarette use or “vaping.”

 

The death, which occurred in an individual older than age 18, was confirmed Sept. 5 as part of an investigation involving health officials at the local and federal levels and in surrounding states. No additional details about the patient will be provided due to privacy laws.

 

Indiana is investigating 30 cases of severe lung injury linked to vaping. Eight of those have been confirmed. The majority of the Indiana cases have occurred among individuals ages 16-29. Nationally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says more than 215 cases have been reported, with more under investigation.

 

“The tragic loss of a Hoosier and rising number of vaping-related injuries are warnings that we cannot ignore,” said State Health Commissioner Kris Box, M.D., FACOG. “We know that these products typically contain nicotine, which is highly addictive, and many cases report inhaling THC and other substances not available in commercial products. While it is unclear what substances are causing injury, when you use these products with other chemicals, you may not know everything that you’re inhaling and the harm it can cause.”

 

Dr. Box said many patients across the U.S. have developed severe symptoms that required emergency intervention and urged anyone who has vaped within the last 90 days and develops respiratory symptoms to stop using these products and see a healthcare professional immediately.

 

Symptoms can include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Cough
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
  • Fever
  • Weight loss
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea

 

ISDH is working with affected individuals and their families to obtain products used by the patients and send them to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testing. At this time, no common substance has been identified in the Indiana cases.

 

The use of e-cigarettes, or vaping, among young people is a rising public health crisis across the U.S. The 2018 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey (IYTS) found that vaping has increased 387 percent among high school students and 358 percent among middle school students since 2012 and that between 2016 and 2018, nearly 35,000 more Indiana students began using e-cigarettes.

 

In response, Dr. Box and Governor Eric J. Holcomb last week announced a $2 million plan to combat youth vaping that focuses on training and education for schools, parents and students, a youth-focused text-to-quit program and a statewide vaping awareness campaign.

 

Parents and educators who want to learn more about ways to protect Indiana youth from the dangers of vaping are urged to visit vapefreeindiana.isdh.in.gov.

 

For the latest on vaping-related injuries nationwide, visit the CDC website.

 

IDHS encourages Hoosiers to get involved with National Preparedness Month 2019

September is National Preparedness Month, and the Indiana Department of Homeland Security (IDHS) encourages Hoosier families to take the necessary steps to make sure households are prepared for all types of disasters.

 

“Preparation can help mitigate the effects and stress caused by any disaster or emergency,” said David Hosick, communications director for IDHS. “Indiana is prone to many different types of severe weather all throughout the year. Taking the time to learn how to prepare for an emergency can greatly increase your chances of staying safe.”

 

National Preparedness Month is the perfect opportunity for Hoosiers to learn lifesaving skills, such as CPR and first aid, how to check insurance policies for common hazards and how to make and practice a household emergency plan. Tornadoes, fires, snow and severe flooding are common occurrences to Hoosiers. Knowing how to stay prepared for these types of situations will not only minimize the effects, but also save lives.

 

Some helpful safety tips to consider are:

  • Become aware of disasters that could occur in the local area. Learn what to look for and what to avoid in each 
  • Discuss possible emergency scenarios with family members. Include events such as fires, natural disasters and man-made disasters. Make sure everyone in the family or workplace knows the steps involved in responding to these 
  • Establish meeting locations in the event of a potential disaster, and make sure all family members and employees are aware of them
  • Create a list of emergency contacts, and share it with family members and friends

National Preparedness Month also emphasizes the importance of creating and updating an emergency disaster kit. For more information on how to craft an effective emergency kit and emergency plan, visit GetPrepared.in.gov.

 

Hoosiers are encouraged to follow IDHS on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram during September to learn more best practices on how to be prepared before a disaster strikes.

Half-price Saturday at the St. Vincent dePaul Society Thrift

Everything will be half price Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the St. Vincent dePaul Society Thrift Store, 424 E. Jackson St., no exceptions, and no limit on purchases.

 

Merchandise in the store includes clothing and shoes for men, women, and children of all ages and all sizes, housewares, knick knacks, jewelry, fashion accessories, books, DVDs, VHS movies, and more. All items have been donated by individuals, businesses, and churches and are priced low to assist those in need. 

 

Photos of furniture items available for purchase at the Society's warehouse, 628 Hodell St., are also posted. The warehouse is open to the public the first Saturdays of each month, 9-11 a.m. or by appointment by calling 317-395-7027. Donations are accepted only at the warehouse during these Saturdays or by appointment.

 

All profits are used to assist residents with tangible assistance on a person-to-person basis. The aid may involve intervention, consultation, and oftentimes include direct dollar and in-kind service.

 

SVdP of Shelby County was established in March 2018 as part of a larger international Society of St. Vincent dePaul. The local Society welcomes new volunteers. The group meets the second and fourth Mondays of each month, 6:30-7:30 p.m., in the St. Vincent dePaul Catholic Church parish hall, 4218 E. Michigan Rd., Shelbyville.

 

Additional information is posted on social media through the website, www.svdpshelbycounty.org and on Facebook as Society of St. Vincent dePaul Society Shelby IN.

Indiana launches effort to curb youth vaping amid hospitalizations, alarming increase in e-cigarette use

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH), at the direction of Governor Eric J. Holcomb, today announced a three-pronged strategy to reduce vaping among Indiana youth. According to the 2018 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey (IYTS), vaping has increased more than 300 percent since 2012, and recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) link vaping to more than 200 severe respiratory illnesses nationwide, including at least 24 in Indiana.

 

Governor Holcomb and State Health Commissioner Kris Box, MD, FACOG, unveiled the plan today at Fishers High School among students, educators, administrators, health partners and local leaders. Following an analysis of the new data, ISDH will increase awareness of the risks associated with e-cigarettes. The plan includes an educational toolkit for schools, parents and students, a youth-focused text-to-quit program and a statewide vaping public awareness campaign to focus both on prevention and cessation.

 

“The number of new young Hoosiers vaping is alarming, and that’s why today’s announcement is critical to the health of our people,” Governor Holcomb said. “Under Dr. Box’s leadership, we will take an all-hands-on-deck approach to curb youth vaping by educating the public on health risks so that fewer youth start using e-cigarettes, while also providing resources to those who want to quit.”

 

The IYTS is a school-based survey of students in grades 6 through 12 that asks about all types of tobacco use, exposure to secondhand smoke, access to tobacco products, knowledge and attitudes, media and advertising, school curriculum and tobacco cessation. The IYTS found that vaping has increased 387 percent among high school students and 358 percent among middle school students since 2012 and that between 2016 and 2018, nearly 35,000 more Indiana students used e-cigarettes.

 

The U.S. Surgeon General has labeled the rising use of e-cigarettes among youth an epidemic and called for action to protect young people from the dangers of nicotine addiction. Earlier today, the Surgeon General’s office announced that according to its records, 30 percent of youth who regularly vape also use marijuana.

 

“Vaping among Indiana’s youth is at an all-time high, and that’s putting thousands of Hoosiers in harm’s way of this epidemic,” Dr. Box said. “Many young people think vaping is harmless, but one e-cigarette can contain the same amount of nicotine as an entire pack of cigarettes. As the number of hospitalizations rises, it’s clear that we need to help youth and parents better understand the health risks of these products before they become the next generation of smokers.”

 

E-cigarettes have become increasingly popular among young people, in part because they come in a variety of flavors, such as mint, candy, fruit and chocolate. According to the IYTS, e-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among Indiana youth. The 2018 survey included questions about USB-type products, such as the popular JUUL, to help health officials better understand the current use of these products. The data show that while nearly 19 percent of high school youth reported current e-cigarette use, 24 percent reported JUUL use. About 22 percent of both high school and middle school students who currently use e-cigarettes also use traditional cigarettes, the survey found.

 

Parents and educators who want to view the full survey and learn more about ways to protect Indiana youth from the dangers of vaping can visit vapefreeindiana.isdh.in.gov.

 

For the latest on vaping-related illnesses nationwide, visit the CDC’s website.

Indiana launches effort to curb youth vaping amid hospitalizations, alarming increase in e-cigarette use

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH), at the direction of Governor Eric J. Holcomb, today announced a three-pronged strategy to reduce vaping among Indiana youth. According to the 2018 Indiana Youth Tobacco Survey (IYTS), vaping has increased more than 300 percent since 2012, and recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) link vaping to more than 200 severe respiratory illnesses nationwide, including at least 24 in Indiana.

 

Governor Holcomb and State Health Commissioner Kris Box, MD, FACOG, unveiled the plan today at Fishers High School among students, educators, administrators, health partners and local leaders. Following an analysis of the new data, ISDH will increase awareness of the risks associated with e-cigarettes. The plan includes an educational toolkit for schools, parents and students, a youth-focused text-to-quit program and a statewide vaping public awareness campaign to focus both on prevention and cessation.

 

“The number of new young Hoosiers vaping is alarming, and that’s why today’s announcement is critical to the health of our people,” Governor Holcomb said. “Under Dr. Box’s leadership, we will take an all-hands-on-deck approach to curb youth vaping by educating the public on health risks so that fewer youth start using e-cigarettes, while also providing resources to those who want to quit.”

 

The IYTS is a school-based survey of students in grades 6 through 12 that asks about all types of tobacco use, exposure to secondhand smoke, access to tobacco products, knowledge and attitudes, media and advertising, school curriculum and tobacco cessation. The IYTS found that vaping has increased 387 percent among high school students and 358 percent among middle school students since 2012 and that between 2016 and 2018, nearly 35,000 more Indiana students used e-cigarettes.

 

The U.S. Surgeon General has labeled the rising use of e-cigarettes among youth an epidemic and called for action to protect young people from the dangers of nicotine addiction. Earlier today, the Surgeon General’s office announced that according to its records, 30 percent of youth who regularly vape also use marijuana.

 

“Vaping among Indiana’s youth is at an all-time high, and that’s putting thousands of Hoosiers in harm’s way of this epidemic,” Dr. Box said. “Many young people think vaping is harmless, but one e-cigarette can contain the same amount of nicotine as an entire pack of cigarettes. As the number of hospitalizations rises, it’s clear that we need to help youth and parents better understand the health risks of these products before they become the next generation of smokers.”

 

E-cigarettes have become increasingly popular among young people, in part because they come in a variety of flavors, such as mint, candy, fruit and chocolate. According to the IYTS, e-cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among Indiana youth. The 2018 survey included questions about USB-type products, such as the popular JUUL, to help health officials better understand the current use of these products. The data show that while nearly 19 percent of high school youth reported current e-cigarette use, 24 percent reported JUUL use. About 22 percent of both high school and middle school students who currently use e-cigarettes also use traditional cigarettes, the survey found.

 

Parents and educators who want to view the full survey and learn more about ways to protect Indiana youth from the dangers of vaping can visit vapefreeindiana.isdh.in.gov.

 

For the latest on vaping-related illnesses nationwide, visit the CDC’s website.

Get #ReadyToVote! September is National Voter Registration Month

Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson is reminding eligible voters that September is National Voter Registration Month. Hoosiers who need to register should do so today at www.IndianaVoters.com or on a smart phone using the Indiana Voters app.

 

“With the November 5th general election just weeks away, there is no time like the present to verify your voter registration and polling location,” noted Secretary Lawson. “Voting is a privilege we enjoy as citizens and getting ready to vote in Indiana is simple and straightforward.”

 

The National Association of Secretaries of State established September as National Voter Registration Month in 2002 to encourage voter participation and increase awareness of state requirements and deadlines for voting.

 

Eligible citizens who are 18 years of age or older may sign up at their county voter registration office, online at www.IndianaVoters.com, or through the Indiana Voters app (available for Android and Apple users).

 

The deadline to register or update your registration is Monday, October 7, 2019.

 

Help Secretary Lawson spread the word about National Voter Registration Month by using the hashtag #ReadyToVote on social media.

Get #ReadyToVote! September is National Voter Registration Month

Indiana Secretary of State Connie Lawson is reminding eligible voters that September is National Voter Registration Month. Hoosiers who need to register should do so today at www.IndianaVoters.com or on a smart phone using the Indiana Voters app.

 

“With the November 5th general election just weeks away, there is no time like the present to verify your voter registration and polling location,” noted Secretary Lawson. “Voting is a privilege we enjoy as citizens and getting ready to vote in Indiana is simple and straightforward.”

 

The National Association of Secretaries of State established September as National Voter Registration Month in 2002 to encourage voter participation and increase awareness of state requirements and deadlines for voting.

 

Eligible citizens who are 18 years of age or older may sign up at their county voter registration office, online at www.IndianaVoters.com, or through the Indiana Voters app (available for Android and Apple users).

 

The deadline to register or update your registration is Monday, October 7, 2019.

 

Help Secretary Lawson spread the word about National Voter Registration Month by using the hashtag #ReadyToVote on social media.

Our Hospice offering unique Skyview at the 33rd annual Free Labor Day Concert featuring Survivor

The Free Labor Day weekend Our Hospice Summer Concert is slated for August 31, 2019 featuring the band, Survivor with opening act, The Woomblies Rock Orchestra.

 

In addition to the generosity of Title Sponsor, Faurecia, and Partner Sponsor, Columbus Regional Health, there are many opportunities for community members to support the concert and again this year, we are offering a unique view of the concert at The Skyview Experience.

 

“The Skyview Experience is a great opportunity for concertgoers who prefer additional convenience and  an amazing view of the band and the event,” said Laura Leonard, Our Hospice President.

 

The Skyview Experience on the platform of the Mill Race Amphitheater offers premier seating with an excellent view of the stage, parking passes, a buffet style picnic, a 70” monitor on the platform and access to private port-o-lets. Skyview tickets are $100 each and a limited number will be sold.

“The Skyview Experience is a great atmosphere to gather with friends and enjoy dinner all while having a unique and breathtaking view of the stage and the crowd.” continued Leonard. “The venue is special and we encourage people to get their Skyview Experience tickets now.”

 

The annual free Labor Day Weekend concert is the largest fundraiser for Our Hospice of South Central Indiana, the first and only not-for-profit hospice care provider in this area. Proceeds from sponsors and raffle tickets help us provide exceptional end-of-life care for patients and families in our 16 county South Central Indiana service area. Charitable donations are critical to providing hospice care to area communities.

 

Learn more on the Our Hospice Facebook Page or contact Julie Davis at 812-314-8085 or email jdavis3@crh.org to reserve your seat at the Skyview Experience!

 

Once again we are grateful to have this event presented by Faurecia as the Title Sponsor and Columbus Regional Health as Partner Sponsor. Follow us on Facebook at Our Hospice to stay up on the latest news and information about this exciting event.

Shelbyville's Labor Day trash and recylcing schedule

There will be no trash or recycling collection in Shelbyville on Monday, September 2, due to the Labor Day holiday.

 

Monday’s trash only will be collected on Tuesday, September 3, along with Tuesday’s trash.

 

Monday’s recycling will be collected on Monday the following week.

 

Residents are reminded to have their trash and recycling set out by 7:00 a.m. for collection.

Rose-Hulman's 'Ask Rose' ready to help local students with math and science homework

Middle school and high school students confronting math and science homework problems can find help with a phone call, email or chat session away through Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology’s AskRose tutoring service.

 

And, it’s free!

 

Rose-Hulman students are available Sunday through Thursday from 7-10 p.m. during the school year to help youth in grades 6 through 12 review math and science concepts. Connections can be made at 877-ASK-ROSE (877-275-7673) or the AskRose website, AskRose.org.

 

AskRose Director Susan Smith Roads says AskRose makes assistance easily available through a variety of different resources, including approximately 30 tutors each night.

 

She points out that rather than give students the answers, tutors guide students through homework problems to help them better understand math and science concepts. Student privacy is always protected, and students are never asked for their last name or telephone number.

 

The service, certified by the National Tutoring Association, has conducted approximately 700,000 tutoring sessions since starting in 1991. AskRose.org also offers more than 500 resources available through videos and downloadable reference materials.

 

All AskRose services are available at no cost to students or parents through a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant and financial assistance from Rose-Hulman.

 

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology offers free math and science tutoring for students in grades 6-12. Students may call 877-ASK-ROSE (877-275-7673) to speak with a tutor, or go to the AskRose website, AskRose.org, to interact with a tutor online or through email.  

 

Questions filed by email and other means are answered during AskRose’s hours of operation.

Don't forget immunizations on your back-to-school list

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) is reminding parents that immunizations are an essential part of getting ready to go back to school.

 

“It’s important to make sure your child’s vaccinations are up-to-date, not only to keep them healthy, but also to prevent the spread of disease to family members and others,” said State Health Commissioner Kris Box, MD, FACOG.

 

School immunization requirements have changed for the 2019-20 school year. Two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine are now required for grades K-7 and 12. Two doses are recommended for all other grades.

 

In addition to these requirements, ISDH also encourages parents to make sure that their child is current with all recommended vaccines, including:

  • An annual influenza vaccine.
  • The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.
  • Two doses of the meningococcal serogroup B (MenB) vaccine for students entering grade 12. Some Indiana universities require this vaccine for incoming students.

A complete list of Indiana school immunization requirements is available at www.state.in.us/isdh/17094.htm. The requirements and recommendations align with the routine vaccination schedules from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

 

ISDH encourages parents to talk with their doctors about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which is available to both boys and girls. The HPV vaccine has been proven to greatly reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer, including cervical cancer. The vaccine is recommended for all boys and girls ages 11 to 12 but can be administered as early as age 9 and as late as age 26 for those who have not been previously vaccinated. The vaccine is administered in a two- or three-dose series, depending on the age at which the first dose is given. For more information on HPV and the vaccine, visit the ISDH website at https://www.in.gov/isdh/25465.htm

 

Hoosiers can access their immunization records through MyVaxIndiana, a user-friendly website that allows parents and other individuals to connect with their immunization records from any computer through the use of a personal identification number (PIN), which is available from your healthcare provider. On the secure website, users can download, print or fax records. Each record also displays the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended immunization schedule. To learn more, visit www.MyVaxIndiana.in.gov.

 

DNR confirms dead, sick deer from EHD in Clark County

Preliminary lab results were positive for epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus in a sample of a dead deer from Clark County the DNR staff submitted to a lab for testing early this month.

Additional testing is required to determine the strain of EHD virus. Results of testing of samples from deer from several other counties are pending.

 

EHD is a viral disease that may affect white-tailed deer to some degree every year. It typically occurs during late summer and early fall, and there is evidence that outbreaks may be worse during drought years. EHD is transmitted by flies commonly known as biting midges, sand gnats, and “no-see-ums.”

 

Humans are not at risk for contracting hemorrhagic disease.

 

The testing came about from investigations DNR staff have been conducting after receiving reports of sick or dead deer in central and south-central Indiana. Clark County seems to be experiencing the most intense outbreaks thus far, but suspect reports have come from 10 counties in total.

 

“Although the reports DNR is receiving are consistent with EHD episodes of past years, it’s important for testing to be done on samples before it can be confirmed,” said Dr. Joe Caudell, DNR deer research biologist. “Samples need to be collected as soon as possible after the deer dies to be most useful for testing.”

 

Caudell worked with Indiana Conservation Officers to collect an adequate sample, the one that tested positive for EHD, on Aug. 2.

 

“Deer infected with EHD may appear depressed or weak and often seek out water. Other signs may include a blue-tinged tongue, swelling of the head, neck or eyelids, ulcers on the tongue and the oral cavity, or sloughed hooves,” said Dr. Nancy Boedeker, DNR wildlife veterinarian.

 

Hemorrhagic disease is often fatal to deer, but some will survive the illness. Not every deer in an affected area will contract hemorrhagic disease. Localized death losses during an outbreak can range from negligible to greater than 50 percent. Outbreaks can be more severe in years in which there is a wet spring followed by a hot, dry fall. Severe outbreaks rarely occur in subsequent years due to immunity gathered from previous infections.

 

“If you see a deer that you suspect may have died from EHD, you can report it directly to the DNR through our website at deer.dnr.IN.gov,” Caudell said. “Just click on the link for Report a Dead or Sick Deer.”

 

The DNR monitors for EHD annually. The most recent significant outbreaks were in 2007 and 2012.

Whitetails Unlimited awards $2,500 to Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry

Whitetails Unlimitedrecently awarded Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry a grantto be used to serve Indiana residents.These funds will help Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry payprocessing fees for large game and livestock donations within Indiana.

 

There are many Hoosiers out there who are working full-time, trying to pay their bills and afford to put enough food on the table to feed their families. According to the latest Feeding America Map the Meal Gap report, a third of Indiana residents who are food insecure can’t qualify for assistance. Protein is an important component of every cell in the body and one of the most important nutrients for brain and body development in children, is also the hardest commodity for food banks to obtain. Those affected by food insecurity are often at high-risk for obesity and diet-related diseases due to the lack of quality in the foods that they can afford. Founded in 2011, Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry asksarea hunters and farmers to take their large game or livestock to a participating meat processor where the donation is processed, packaged and frozen (at no cost to the donor). Local hunger-relief agencies are contacted for pick up and distribution of this nutritious protein back into the community.

 

“Protein, an important component of every cell in the body and one of the most important nutrients for brain and body development in children, is also the hardest commodity for food banks to obtain.Our goal is to provide this protein-packed meat to hunger-relief agencies within Indiana to assist those in need of additional food services. Getting groceries at local food banks and pantries guarantees healthy meals for families when they need extra help. This program works to ensure that these agencies have meat, allowing us to provide fresh nutritious protein for hungry local families. This effort will help build stronger, healthier communities by meeting a basic need - reducing food insecurity and empowering people by getting them back on track to hunger-free, independent living.” said Debra Treesh, Executive Director of Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry.

 

More than 300,000 Indiana children have no idea where their next meal is coming from…

 

“The grant provided by Whitetails Unlimited will pay to process about2,050 pounds of donated large game and livestock – providing almost 8,200 moremeals through area hunger-relief agencies to residents in need within our communities,” said Treesh. In the last eight years, Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry has helped to distribute approximately1.3 million pounds of meat to Indiana food banks, providing over5.3 million meals to Hoosiers in need.“To date, we have 87 participating meat processors working throughout Indiana to aid us in our mission and to ensure residents in need are served,” shared Amber Zecca, Fund Development Director of Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry.

 

On average, the cost of this donated meat is about $1.30 per pound, which is less than $.30 per meal!

 

Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry is accepting donations to fund our “Meat” the Need program throughout Indiana and is continuously looking for volunteers to help us in our efforts to feed the hungry and reduce hunger issues throughout Indiana. For more information on the Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry program, its services and to find participating meat processors in your area, or to find out how you can help, please visit www.HoosiersFeedingtheHungry.org.

Start planning your route ahead of I-465 EB/NB full closure

The Indiana Department of Transportation is closing a portion of I-465 starting Friday, August 9. 

 

I-465 EB/NB will be closed from I-65 to I-70 on the Southeast side of Indianapolis. 

 

All lanes will be closed from 9 p. m. Friday for 15 days and will reopen Saturday, August 24. 

 

As part of the closure, Old U.S. 421 and the Shadeland collector lanes will be closed as well. 

INDOT is encouraging drivers to plan ahead and find alternate routes during the closure. Be prepared for slow and stopped traffic and plan extra time.

 

Posted Detour 

Thru traffic can take I-70 EB through Indianapolis to get to I-465 NB. 

I-74 EB traffic can take I-465 SB to I-65 NB to I-70 EB to get to I-465 NB.

 

Alternate Routes

For I-465 EB:

  • Raymond St.
  • Brookville Rd./English Ave.
  • Southeastern Ave. 
  • Washington St.
  • New York St.
  • 10th St.

For I-465 NB:

  • Shadeland Ave.
  • Emerson Ave.
  • Arlington Ave.
  • Franklin Rd.
  • Post Rd.
  • Mt. Comfort Rd.

For I-74 EB to I-465: 

  • Post Rd. to I-70 WB
  • S County Line Rd to N Cumberland Rd to I-70 WB
  • S.R. 9 to I-70 WB

Time capsule buried in honor of 25th Indiana Derby at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

In a joint effort between the City of Shelbyville, the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce, and the Shelby County Tourism and Visitors’ Bureau, a special time capsule was buried in the infield at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino. The time capsule contained numerous items presented by all organizations representing Shelby County to commemorate the 25th running of the Grade III $500,000 Indiana Derby on Saturday, July 13. A special presentation was made during the races with representatives from each entity trackside for the ceremony.

 

 

Items placed in the time capsule will be opened in 2044 to mark the 50th running of the Indiana Derby. Dignitaries in 25 years will find a letter from Mayor Tom DeBaun reviewing all the updates and changes currently taking place in Shelbyville, a book from the Visitors’ Bureau filled with photos of the county, a Shelby County Chamber guide and jump drive filled with information about current companies, plus various pieces from the 25th Indiana Derby, from a racing program to a commemorative lapel pin, identifying a few of the items in the capsule.

 

“The Shelby County Chamber was honored to be invited to add items to the time capsule,” said Julie Metz, executive director of the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce. “A 2019 Directory and Community Guide was selected along with a jump drive of videos of our 2019 Annual Awards Gala highlighting businesses and individuals in Shelby County that contribute their talents to our community.  Now, we all wonder, will the group that opens the time capsule in 2044 know what to do with a jump drive?”

 

The items were sealed in a time capsule created by Equine Maintenance worker Mike White at Indiana Grand made from part of an old hub rail used on the inside of the track. Justin Gabbard of Equine Maintenance and Austin Johns of the Track Maintenance crew identified the perfect spot and created the hole for the time capsule, located just south of the tote board in the infield of the racetrack.

 

Instructions for digging up the time capsule in 2044 have been submitted to both the City of Shelbyville as well as the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce. A special plaque was designed to mark the spot of the time capsule so the location may readily be found in 50 years.

 

“Adding the time capsule to our 25-year celebration of the Indiana Derby was a great way to pull our community partners into the event,” said Elena Lisle, vice president of marketing at Indiana Grand. “Although it’s likely none of us will be around to unveil the time capsule in 25 years, we are hopeful the new group will bury another time capsule in 2044 to be opened for the 75th running of the Indiana Derby in 2069.”

 

Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing continues through Wednesday, Nov. 6. Racing is conducted Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday at 2:15 p.m. and Saturday at 6:15 p.m. More information about the season is available at www.indianagrand.com.

 

Indiana Grand Racing & Casino, which is owned and operated by a subsidiary of Caesars Entertainment Corporation (NASDAQ: CZR), holds multiple awards for customer service, entertainment, gaming, dining, and diversity. Located in Shelbyville, Ind., Indiana Grand features 2,200 of the latest slots and electronic table games in addition to a one-mile dirt race course and a seven-eighths mile turf course offering live Thoroughbred and Quarter Horse racing each year. Simulcast wagering is also offered year-round at Winner’s Circle Brewpub & OTB located on the casino floor as well as a Winner’s Circle OTB located in Clarksville, Ind. For more information, please visit www.IndianaGrand.com. Must be 18 or older to wager on horse racing at racetracks and 21 or older to gamble at casinos.  Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-9-WITH-IT (1-800-994-8448) ©2019 Caesars License Company, LLC.

Tips for visiting the Indiana State Fair

The Indiana State Fair runs from August 2 until August 18 in Indianapolis.

 

The Indiana State Police would like to offers some tips to make your trip to the fair more enjoyable and less stressful.

 

  • Plan Ahead - visit www.indianastatefair.com to see the day's hours, events and activities
  • Parking - You can access the Indiana State Fairgrounds from several gates on each side of the property. Take time to research you best option for parking by visiting www.indianastatefairparking.com . Once you park take a photograph of your parking area with your cell phone so you can remember where you parked or download an app on you phone such as Find My Car. Each year Troopers spend a lot of time helping people find their cars because people had forgotten where they parked.
  • Your Vehicle - Be sure to lock your doors, if you have valuables inside the vehicle that you are not carrying with you it is best to leave them at home. If you must leave them in the car be sure they are out of sight, locking them in the trunk is the best option.
  • Cell Phones - Be sure you download the appropriate application on your cell phone to allow you to "find my phone." Each year approximately 50-60 lost cell phones are turned into the Indiana State Police.
  • Lost Children - One common occurrence for Troopers at the fair is locating lost children. A few things that will help expedite finding a lost child is a detailed description of their clothing. One option is to take a photo of your child when you arrive at the fairgrounds, in the event you become separated that photo can be quickly shared with dozens of public safety personnel at the fairgrounds. If your child does not know your phone number you can write it on their arm, or you can pick up a child ID bracelet from any Indiana State Police Booth. Sometime adults or elderly visitors can become separated from their caregivers, some of the same options above can be used in these situations as well 
  • 'See Something, Say Something' - Report suspicious or criminal activity to police

With appropriate planning and patience your Indiana State Fair visit will be a great experience.

Shelby County Master Gardeners host the 2019 Pollinator Walk-n-Talk

The Shelby County Master Gardeners Association, in cooperation with Purdue Extension, will host their first annual Walk-N-Talk on Thursday, August the 8th (8/8/19).  This will be followed by a Butterfly Workshop.  You, too, can learn how to build your own backyard habitat for butterflies.

 

As the name implies, we will start our first ever Walk-N-Talk by touring some of the gardens and pollinator beds in the downtown area.  For the tour, we will meet at 3:30 in the new Japanese Garden on 151 West Washington Street.  We will walk to several nearby gardens and pollinator beds.  Please dress for the weather and wear comfortable shoes.  The walk will be rescheduled if thunderstorms are present or imminent.  Contact the Purdue Extension Office (listed below) if you are uncertain.

 

At 6:30 PM, rain or shine, our guest speaker from Huntington Indiana, Purdue Extension’s Karen Hinshaw will host the Butterfly Workshop at the Purdue Extension – Shelby County office (1600 E State Road 44, Ste C).  This workshop will feature butterfly life cycles, butterfly facts & myths, and information on how to attract butterflies to your garden/yard. Butterfly eggs, caterpillars in various stages and butterflies may be available for viewing as mother nature permits.  Depending on availability, participants may be able to take home caterpillars to raise and release. Participants will learn about pollinators and how important they are to our food system. 

 

This program is appropriate for all ages.  Master Gardeners will also be available to work with youngsters to complete crafts while parents participate in the program.  Please call the Purdue Extension office at 317-392-6460 or e-mail at shelbyces@purdue.edu to register for the evening program.  Registration is preferred.  Space is limited. Those that register will receive priority seating.

 

Come join us.  We’ll show you what some have done locally, give you what we can, and help you get started. Empowered with a few how-to’s, you can help Shelby County blossom and buzz.

Shelby County to celebrate Bridge 13 placement at Blue River Memorial with ribbon-cutting ceremony

The Shelby County Commissioners will hold a public ceremony to celebrate the long-awaited relocation of Shelby County’s Historic Truss Bridge #13.  Originally built in 1889, this structure has been rehabilitated and now carries a shared-use path, the Blue River Trail, over a man-made water feature at Blue River Memorial Park in Shelbyville, Indiana.    

 

Bridge #13 History:  The original structure was a 93-foot-long, narrow iron and steel Pratt truss, carrying one lane of traffic on CR 875 West over Buck Creek in northeast Shelby County. 

 

In 2011, the bridge was closed to traffic due to damage and deterioration, with a sufficiency rating of 13. The bridge was classified as a “Select” Historic Bridge and described as an outstanding example of its type, but best suited for non-vehicular use based on condition and structural capacity constraints. The bridge was eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, but due to technicalities, the Shelby County bridge project was subjected to a full Section 106 process, including a Memorandum of Agreement.  An Alternatives Analysis determined the most “prudent and feasible” alternative was replacement of the existing bridge (which was completed in May 2019 and designated as “Bridge 219”),along with relocation of the historic truss, which now resides in Shelbyville Indiana’s Blue River Memorial Park.  The bridge was marketed for re-use for a period of six months, followed by a public hearing to complete the public involvement process.  Construction was completed in July 2019. 

 

This beautifully restored historic truss bridge sits back near the Little Blue River, within walking distance just south of the ball diamond parking lot at Blue River Memorial Park.  The ribbon-cutting will take place at this site on Monday, August 5, 2019 at 10:00am.

On My Way Pre-K now enrolling children in all 92 Indiana counties

As the 2019/2020 school year approaches, more than half the available slots have been filled for Indiana’s state-sponsored On My Way Pre-K program. Right now Hoosier children and their families are getting connected with high-quality providers in their area, as state law recently expanded the program statewide.

 

Low-income families are encouraged to act quickly to see if they are eligible for On My Way Pre-K for their 4-year-old children as soon as August. On My Way Pre-K has served approximately 8,000 eligible families at no charge to them to help prepare young Hoosiers for kindergarten.

 

“Our research tells us that On My Way Pre-K children make higher gains than their peers in important aspects of school readiness such as language comprehension, early literacy, executive functioning and a reduction in behavior problems in the classroom,” said Nicole Norvell, director of Indiana’s Office of Early Childhood and Out-of-School Learning.

 

Families must meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • The family must have an income below 127 percent of the federal poverty level.
  • Their child must be 4-years-old by August 1, 2019, and starting kindergarten in the 2020/2021 school year.
  • Parents or guardians in the household must be working, going to school or attending job training.

Links to electronic applications in both English and Spanish are available at OnMyWayPreK.org. Now is the time to act because space is limited and school begins soon. Applications are open year-round.

 

Families may call 800-299-1627 for assistance from an early learning referral specialist or for other questions about On My Way Pre-K. Stay up-to-date via Facebook @OnMyWayPreKIndiana.

BBB warns of asphalt paving and sealcoating scams

The Better Business Bureau (BBB)?is warning consumers of a seasonal door-to-door scam that tends to pop up in warmer months – asphalt paving and sealcoating scam. 

 

The setup is often the same, someone driving by in a truck stops at your home and offers you cheap asphalt paving or sealcoating. Consumers are told the cost is low because the materials are left over from a job the workers just completed nearby and they just want to get rid of the materials.  This is a case where low price does not equal a good deal, seldom do you get what you pay for in a situation like this.  Consumers report that the materials are very low quality with the asphalt being very thin or crumbly. Some sealcoating applications actually wash away during the first rain.  

 

Consumers often report that they are asked to pay much more once the job is completed.  There are also times when the paver/sealcoater says they have run out of material and will return the next day to complete the job, but they never return. 

 

To avoid being tricked by asphalt/sealcoating scams, always know whom you’re dealing with and research the business at?bbb.org. You can always ask the salesperson if they have a solicitor’s license from the city in which they’re doing business, or you can call your city officials directly to ask if they’ve received any complaints about a certain business.

 

BBB offers the following tips when dealing with an asphalt paver/sealcoating offer: 

 

  • Be wary of paving companies stating they have extra asphalt/sealcoat ready to repair your driveway for a minimal cost. Professional asphalt contractors know, with great accuracy, how much paving material is needed to complete a project. They will rarely have leftover materials. 

  • Never hire someone on the spot. Trustworthy contractors provide a written estimate that will be valid for many days. If you feel that you are being subjected to high-pressure sales tactics, BBB advises you to end the conversation and tell the business you’re not interested. 

  • Do your homework.  Get at least three estimates before hiring anyone.  Make sure the estimates are descriptive as to what work will be done and what materials will be used. 

  • Don’t pay with cash. Credit cards are always best as there are options for recovering your lost funds.  If you pay by check, make it out to the business, never an individual. 

Consumers are often safer dealing with a contractor who has local roots.?Contact BBB for free Business Profiles on any company you are considering doing business with by visiting?bbb.org, or by calling 317.488.2222. 

 

If you have been scammed, you can help other consumers avoid the same problems by reporting your experience to?BBB’s?Scam Tracker

BBB warns of asphalt paving and sealcoating scams

The Better Business Bureau (BBB)?is warning consumers of a seasonal door-to-door scam that tends to pop up in warmer months – asphalt paving and sealcoating scam. 

 

The setup is often the same, someone driving by in a truck stops at your home and offers you cheap asphalt paving or sealcoating. Consumers are told the cost is low because the materials are left over from a job the workers just completed nearby and they just want to get rid of the materials.  This is a case where low price does not equal a good deal, seldom do you get what you pay for in a situation like this.  Consumers report that the materials are very low quality with the asphalt being very thin or crumbly. Some sealcoating applications actually wash away during the first rain.  

 

Consumers often report that they are asked to pay much more once the job is completed.  There are also times when the paver/sealcoater says they have run out of material and will return the next day to complete the job, but they never return. 

 

To avoid being tricked by asphalt/sealcoating scams, always know whom you’re dealing with and research the business at?bbb.org. You can always ask the salesperson if they have a solicitor’s license from the city in which they’re doing business, or you can call your city officials directly to ask if they’ve received any complaints about a certain business.

 

BBB offers the following tips when dealing with an asphalt paver/sealcoating offer: 

 

  • Be wary of paving companies stating they have extra asphalt/sealcoat ready to repair your driveway for a minimal cost. Professional asphalt contractors know, with great accuracy, how much paving material is needed to complete a project. They will rarely have leftover materials. 

  • Never hire someone on the spot. Trustworthy contractors provide a written estimate that will be valid for many days. If you feel that you are being subjected to high-pressure sales tactics, BBB advises you to end the conversation and tell the business you’re not interested. 

  • Do your homework.  Get at least three estimates before hiring anyone.  Make sure the estimates are descriptive as to what work will be done and what materials will be used. 

  • Don’t pay with cash. Credit cards are always best as there are options for recovering your lost funds.  If you pay by check, make it out to the business, never an individual. 

Consumers are often safer dealing with a contractor who has local roots.?Contact BBB for free Business Profiles on any company you are considering doing business with by visiting?bbb.org, or by calling 317.488.2222. 

 

If you have been scammed, you can help other consumers avoid the same problems by reporting your experience to?BBB’s?Scam Tracker

Blue River Community Foundation's summer scholarship application cycle

Shelby County high school students on track to graduate by June 30, 2020 can now apply for

scholarships during Blue River Community Foundation’s summer scholarship cycle. Students applying during this cycle will be considered for both the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship and BRCF General Scholarship opportunities.

 

Applicants must meet the minimum eligibility requirements (listed below) for Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship consideration; however, all students are encouraged to apply for over 100 scholarships awarded annually through BRCF’s General Scholarship Program. The deadline to apply is September 1, 2019.

 

Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program

Blue River Community Foundation (BRCF) is proud to partner with Lilly Endowment Inc. to select one Shelby County high school senior as a nominee for the 2020 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program. Independent Colleges of Indiana on behalf of Lilly Endowment Inc. will make final scholarship selections and notify BRCF of their decision by December 6, 2019. BRCF will notify the recipient of the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship by December 20, 2019.

 

The Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship Program is designed to raise the level of educational attainment in Indiana and further leverage the ability of Indiana’s community foundations to improve the quality of life of the state’s residents.

 

The scholarship provides FULL TUITION, required fees, and a special allocation of up to $900 per year for required books and required equipment for four years of undergraduate study on a full-time basis, leading to a baccalaureate degree at any Indiana public or private college or university accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

 

Minimum requirements that must be met for consideration include:

Reside in Shelby County

 

Graduate by the end of June with a diploma from a regionally accredited Indiana High School

 

Intend to pursue a full-time baccalaureate course of study at an accredited public or private

college or university in Indiana

 

Demonstrate the following:

 

Participation in community activities

 

Leadership skills in school, community, and/or extracurricular activities

 

Commitment to academics and ability to succeed at the next level

 

Must have a minimum 3.5 GPA and a minimum 1100 total score on SAT or ACT equivalent

 

Financial need may be considered but is not a determining factor

 

BRCF General Scholarship Program

Blue River Community Foundation (BRCF) administers over 90 scholarship funds established by caring and generous donor who are passionate about supporting students reach their post-secondary educational goals. For the 2019-20 academic year, these BRCF administered funds awarded 168 scholarships to 129 students for a combined total over $340,000. Applicants who complete this application in full are considered for all scholarships administered by BRCF for which they are eligible.

 

For a complete list of these scholarship funds, please visit the Foundation's website,

www.blueriverfoundation.com and review the scholarship resource guide. For more information about the summer scholarship application cycle, contact Julie Alvis, BRCF Youth & Education Program Officer, at 317.392.7955 ext. 102 or jalvis@blueriverfoundation.com.

New Farmers.gov feature helps producers find farm loans that fit their operation

A new online tool can help farmers and ranchers find information on U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) farm loans that may best fit their operations. USDA has launched the new Farm Loan Discovery Tool as the newest feature on farmers.gov, the Department’s self-service website for farmers.

 

“Access to credit is critical in the agriculture industry, especially for new farmers,” said Bill Northey, Under Secretary for Farm Production and Conservation. “This new interactive tool can help farmers find information on USDA farm loans within minutes. We are working to improve our customer service, and part of our solution is through improving how farmers can work with us online.”

 

USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) offers a variety of loan options to help farmers finance their operations. From buying land to financing the purchase of equipment, FSA loans can help. Compared to this time last year, FSA has seen an 18 percent increase in the amount it has obligated for direct farm ownership loans, and through the 2018 Farm Bill, has increased the limits for several loan products.

 

USDA conducted field research in eight states, gathering input from farmers and FSA farm loan staff to better understand their needs and challenges.

 

“We received suggestions from both farmers and our staff on how to improve the farm loan process, and we wanted to harness this opportunity to be more efficient and effective,” Northey said. “This feature is one step in our efforts.”

 

How the Tool Works

 

Farmers who are looking for financing options to operate a farm or buy land can answer a few simple questions about what they are looking to fund and how much money they need to borrow. After submitting their answers, farmers will be provided information on farm loans that best fit their specific needs. The loan application and additional resources also will be provided.

 

Farmers can download application quick guides that outline what to expect from preparing an application to receiving a loan decision. There are four guides that cover loans to individuals, entities, and youth, as well as information on microloans. The guides include general eligibility requirements and a list of required forms and documentation for each type of loan. These guides can help farmers prepare before their first USDA service center visit with a loan officer.

 

Farmers can access the Farm Loan Discovery Tool by visiting farmers.gov/fund and clicking the “Start” button. Follow the prompts and answer five simple questions to receive loan information that is applicable to your agricultural operation. The tool is built to run on any modern browser like Chrome, Edge, Firefox, or the Safari browser, and is fully functional on mobile devices. It does not work in Internet Explorer.

 

About Farmers.gov

 

In 2018, USDA unveiled farmers.gov, a dynamic, mobile-friendly public website combined with an authenticated portal where farmers will be able to apply for programs, process transactions, and manage accounts.

 

The Farm Loan Discovery Tool is one of many resources on farmers.gov to help connect farmers to information that can help their operations. Earlier this year, USDA launched the My Financial Information feature, which enables farmers to view their loan information, history, payments, and alerts by logging into the website.

 

USDA is building farmers.gov for farmers, by farmers. In addition to the interactive farm loan features, the site also offers a Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool. Farmers can visit farmers.gov/recover/disaster-assistance-tool#step-1 to find disaster assistance programs that can help their operation recover from natural disasters.

 

With feedback from customers and field employees who serve those customers, farmers.gov delivers farmer-focused features through an agile, iterative process to deliver the greatest immediate value to America’s agricultural producers – helping farmers and ranchers do right, and feed everyone.

 

For more information or to locate your USDA Service Center, visit farmers.gov.

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