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Shelby Co. graduation rates above state average

The Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) released the 2021 state graduation rates, with data showing 86.69% of students in the Class of 2021 graduating.

 

"Across our state, our educators, families and community leaders are working to be difference-makers in our students' lives, preparing them not only for graduation but for the rapidly-changing world that awaits,” said Dr. Katie Jenner, Indiana Secretary of Education. “Looking ahead into 2022 and beyond, we must continue to work together to ensure our students earn their high school diploma and have access to intentional post-secondary credentials in high school. This mission takes all of us as we strive to make an impact on our students' lives, now and well into the future."

 

State graduation rates in Shelby County:

Shelbyville - 95.20%

Southwestern - 95.56%

Triton Central - 90.98%

Morristown - 94.44%

Waldron - 93.88%

 

A spreadsheet with statewide-, corporation- and school-level graduation data is available here.

 

These graduation rates correspond with research that shows that the academic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are substantial. According to research from IDOE and the National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, Inc., the academic impact ranges from moderate to significant across schools, academic subjects and demographic groups. In response, IDOE launched several accelerated learning programs, which are still underway and will be joined by additional efforts planned for next year.

 

This year, nearly 40% of Hoosier students graduated with a Core 40 honors diploma (academic, technical or both) or an International Baccalaureate diploma. Additionally, more than 78% graduated without requiring a waiver from passing the Graduation Qualifying Exam – an increase of nearly two percentage points from 2019.

 

Due to differences between federal and state accountability equations and standards, IDOE also released 2021 federal graduation rates. In 2021, Indiana’s federal graduation rate was 85.75%.

Upcoming downtown Indy traffic restrictions slated for January 2022

As the North Split Interchange closure progresses, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) announced today a series of closures and traffic restrictions to begin in January 2022.

Starting on or after January 3 through January 25, weather permitting, the ramp from Meridian/11th Street to Delaware Street will experience daytime lane restrictions Monday through Thursday from 6:00 am to 5:00 pm. Both the right-hand and left-hand lanes at the intersection of Meridian and 11th Street will be closed as crews work to improve overhead traffic signals. Motorists will be directed to the center lane to progress through the intersection. Minimal traffic impacts are anticipated throughout the duration of these restrictions.

Also starting on or after January 3, Michigan Street will close through January 17 and 10th Street will close through January 15, all weather permitting. Michigan Street will close under I-65 between Davidson Street and Pine Street for overhead structure demolition. Motorists traveling west on Michigan Street will be detoured to Rural Street, then directed west on Washington Street to College Avenue.

10th Street will close under I-65 and I-70 between College Avenue and Highland Avenue for overhead structure demolition and beam erection. Throughout the duration of this closure, motorists traveling eastbound and westbound will be detoured to 16th Street.

INDOT further reminds motorists the ramp from Delaware /11th Street to I-70 eastbound is scheduled to close on or after January 11. This closure will be in effect for approximately 60 days. Traffic will be detoured to West Street onto I-70 eastbound, or New York or Ohio streets to Pine Street onto I-70 eastbound.

Access to downtown Indianapolis will be maintained via: 

  • I-70 westbound collector/distributor (C/D) ramp exit ramp to Michigan Street (13-ton declared vehicle weight restriction in effect) 
  • Pine Street entrance ramp to I-70 eastbound from Ohio Street, Michigan Street and New York Street  
  • I-65 northbound/I-70 eastbound exit ramp to Washington Street (13-ton declared vehicle weight restriction in effect) 
  • I-65 northbound and southbound to Martin Luther King. Jr./West Street 
  • I-65 southbound to Meridian Street 
  • I-65 northbound to Meridian and Pennsylvania Streets 
  • All existing ramps on I-70 west of the South Split 

INDOT encourages drivers to slow down, exercise caution and drive distraction-free through all work zones.

Stay informed

For up-to-date project information, visit northsplit.com or text “NORTHSPLIT” to 468311. Follow the North Split project’s progress on social media at:

Motorists can monitor road closures, road conditions, traffic alerts and see traffic cameras anywhere throughout the state by visiting INDOT’s Cars 511 website.


Shelby County officially recognized 200 years ago on Dec. 31, 1821

As the minutes wind down on 2021 and preparations for 2022 are made, Shelby County and the City of Shelbyville are prepared for a milestone year.

Shelby County was officially recognized on Dec. 31, 1821, by Governor Jonathan Jennings.

Shelby County is now 200 years old and the City of Shelbyville will follow with the same historic birth date in 2022.

The county was first settled in 1818 by James Wilson and three of his sons. Wilson’s wife and six more children followed in January of 1819.

The Wilson family settled along the Blue River and eventually encouraged more people to follow suit.

On Oct. 2, 1820, the Brookeville Land Office opened and land in central Indiana was put up for sale. There were over 100 purchases in the first two months.

Within a year, Shelby County was officially created.

Bicentennial celebrations were planned but have been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Local officials expect to have a celebration in 2022 for both Shelby County and Shelbyville.

Supreme Court ruling on special session power months away as legislature begins session

As the Indiana legislature returns to the Statehouse next week for the upcoming session, the lawsuit between the governor and lawmakers hangs over Indianapolis after the legislature overrode Governer Holcomb’s veto of a bill that allows lawmakers to call themselves into a special session to deal with an emergency, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 

The legal fight over the increased power Indiana legislators gave themselves to intervene during public health emergencies will be going before the state Supreme Court.  But that's months away.

 

Previously, only the governor could convene a special session. Holcomb's lawsuit argues that the Legislature is "usurping a power given exclusively to the governor" under the state constitution.

 

A Marion County judge upheld the new law.  After reviewing the ruling, Holcomb's lawyers filed an appeal asking the Indiana Supreme Court to take up the case in order to get “clarity and finality on this important issue.” 

 

So, what effect, if any, on the session that will begin and conclude before that?   

 

Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch doesn’t think it will get in the way of lawmakers duty during the session.

 

 

Crouch says unprecedented times sometimes lead to disputes such as this one.

 

 

The Lt. Governor says it’s good the issue is going before the state’s highest court.

 

 

The Supreme Court's order sets an April 7 hearing for oral arguments in the case.

 

 


Public's help requested on campsite reservation scam

Indiana Conservation Officers are investigating a potential scam where unsuspecting Hoosiers are being duped when booking campsites.

The public’s assistance is being sought in the investigation where a third party fraudulently advertises and rents campsites to Hoosiers, who then upon arrival, find the site they paid for not available.

Instances of this scam could date back as far as July 2021. 

If you have utilized a third party on social media for reserving a site for this upcoming year, you may be a victim of this scam.

State properties of interest include Trine State Recreation Area, Spring Mill State Park, Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Greene Sullivan State Forest, and McCormick’s Creek State Park.

If you believe you have been or are currently a victim of this scam, please contact our Indiana Conservation Officer Central Dispatch at 812-837-9536.

Hoosiers are reminded to only make reservations for DNR properties via the official DNR website at Camp.IN.gov or the DNR Reservation Line at 866-622-6746.     

Spegal's Prime Cuts open for business in downtown Shelbyville

The Spegal family has been producing and selling Red Poll beef to friends and family for three generations.

With the opening of its new storefront at 48 Public Square in downtown Shelbyville, the Spegals are branching out the family business with the creation of a fully-functioning butcher shop and kitchen.

The goal is to create a one-stop shop for lunch and dinner fare all raised and produced in Indiana.

Spegal’s Prime Cuts officially opened Tuesday although it is not yet 100% finished.

The cut room, which will be visible from the main lobby of the storefront, is ready for electricity and plumbing to be added. The commercial kitchen also is under construction and when finished will help stock the store with fresh products and potentially bakery items.

James and Mary Spegal started the family business in 1954 when they purchased 90 acres of Fairland farmland and three Red Poll cows. Gail and Shirley Spegal eventually took over the farm and expanded the herd.

Six years ago, Gregg Spegal, Gail and Shirley’s son and James and Mary’s grandson, retired from active service in the National Guard and decided, along with his wife, Amy, to be more active on the farm which is now about 400 acres and 40 Red Poll cows strong.

To expand the beef business, the third generation of Spegals started working farmer’s markets in central Indiana. But that was seasonal and still left the family with plenty of beef to market.

A delivery to a local real estate agent sparked a conversation about setting up a storefront. Within a month, the Spegals were looking at three Shelbyville buildings.

“I definitely didn’t want to buy a building,” said Gregg Spegal. “I was not convinced I wanted to rent a building.”

The Spegals met with Rupert Boneham at 48 Public Square and were intrigued with the possibilities. At first, Boneham didn’t want to sell the building which housed an arcade but a deal was struck and the Spegals closed in October of 2020.

The second oldest building on the Public Square, built in 1864, has seen many businesses set up shop over the decades. Spegal found remnants of several of those while stripping the walls and the floors.

 

Gregg Spegal, right, and his daughter, Megan, stayed busy last week during the first week of operations for Spegal's Prime Cuts. The storefront business is a first for the Spegal family that has been raising and selling Red Poll beef for three generations.

 

The goal was to open the shop in April of 2021 but that proved ambitious. The family attempted to do most of the renovation work themselves but that took time while trying to maintain the farm.

“We started tearing stuff out … all the layers on the walls,” said Spegal. “There was more to all that than what I thought there was. The floors, there were two and three layers of tile and carpet. The very bottom layer was tar paper. I guess back in the day that was how they sealed under tile. It comes off really hard.”

Once the main lobby was finished and the walk-in cooler and freezer were operational, the decision was made to open the doors.

The store is stocked with fresh beef, sausages and locally-produced honey. A large meat case still sits empty due to supply issues that will be remedied in January.

“By the end of January we should start bringing in all fresh meat,” he said.

A large shelving system at the front of the store will be stocked with Indiana products. A new cooler will arrive soon to add storage space for items needing refrigerated.

The plan is to add fresh pork, chicken and lamb to the meat selection.

“I am hoping we will be all done here in the next two months,” said Spegal. “We are closer than it looks. A lot of the bigger construction stuff is done. It won’t take much more to finish (the back).”

The new goal is to have a Grand Opening in April. But with meat to sell, the family’s first storefront operation is open for business.

“Tuesday was busy,” said Spegal. “We were talking to people all day long.”

The Spegals hope that is a trend that will continue on for several more generations.


Silver Alert: Patricia Hyatt, Greenfield

The Hancock County Sheriff’s Department is investigating the disappearance of Patricia Hyatt, 61, a white female, 5 feet 6 inches tall, 190 pounds, brown hair with blue eyes, last seen wearing a black jacket, dark colored pants, and driving a black 2004 Jeep Liberty with Illinois license plate AV75253.

 

Patricia is missing from Greenfield.  She was last seen on Wednesday, December 22, 2021, at 10:10 am. She is believed to be in extreme danger and may require medical assistance. 

 

If you have any information on Patricia Hyatt, contact the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department at 317-477-4400 or 911.

Indiana National Guard promotes Shelbyville native to major general

The Indiana National Guard promoted its newest general during a ceremony at the Indiana War Memorial earlier this month.

 

Timothy J. Winslow, a Shelbyville native, was promoted by his family – wife, Catherine; sister, Janine; daughter, Jordan, and son, Josh – this past weekend to the rank of major general.

 

“I look forward to the challenge and opportunity of being the assistant adjutant general,” said Winslow. “I will serve the soldiers, airmen and civilian employees of the Indiana National Guard, as the adjutant general and I continue our people first strategy.”

 

Winslow, who recently served as the director of joint staff since May 2019, has served in many positions throughout the Indiana National Guard including the chief of staff, the 138th Regiment commander, the operations officer, the 38th Infantry Division chief of staff and the state's Army aviation officer among others.

 

“A highlight of this promotion is Tim stays on my command team,” said Lyles. “He's been an integral part of the team, helping to guide the Indiana National Guard during an unprecedented and historic time for our state and nation.”

 

During the ceremony, Winslow received a two-star flag as Indiana’s newest major general.

 

Winslow, who's rated as a master Army aviator, commissioned as a second lieutenant in May 1989 from the Purdue University Reserve Officers' Training Corps. He's flown more than 2,400 hours and rated for UH-60, OH-58, UH-1 helicopters and C-12 cargo planes.

 

Winslow, who lives in Carmel with his wife, Catherine, graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in advertising concepts.


MHP Incident Command Covid-19 Update - December 22

Inpatient unit:  All forty of our 40 beds are occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit. 

  • We currently have fifteen critical care patients on the 3rd floor and eleven (73%) of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the eleven Covid-related critical care patients, only one is vaccinated.   
  • We have nine patients on ventilators and seven of those patients are Covid positive.  We have six additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap and five of those patients are Covid positive.  
  • Twenty-six (65%) of our inpatients are Covid positive and nineteen (73%) of them are unvaccinated.

Emergency Department:  Our ACC unit currently has thirteen observation patients.  We have ten infusions scheduled today and we infused twenty-eight patients yesterday.  We have 73 doses of Regeneron remaining. 

 

Urgent Care and Walk-in visits:  Priority Care saw fifty patients yesterday, which is considerably lower than the previous several days.  MHP Pediatric walk-in visits are also much lower this week compared to the previous weeks. 

 

Get your Covid vaccine at MedWorks Pharmacy:  MedWorks Pharmacy is offering the Pfizer vaccine and Pfizer booster, Johnson & Johnson vaccine and booster, as well as the Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  We request patients call to schedule an appointment for the Pediatric dosing, which is available on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Call 317-421-2020 to schedule an appointmentAll the other vaccines can be scheduled on the MHP website or by calling MedWorks directly.  https://www.mymhp.org/news-media/categories/covid-19-updates/  We accept walk-ins for the adult vaccines as well.    

Shelby County to name committee to formulate plan for ARP money

Shelby County will look to name a committee to determine the future of millions of dollars in American Rescue Plan money.

 

The American Rescue Plan will deliver $350 billion for eligible state, local, territorial, and Tribal governments to respond to the COVID-19 emergency and bring back jobs.

 

Shelby County Commissioner Don Parker.

 

 

Shelby County received approximately $8.7 million in ARP money.


A change with the new year as Shelbyville Central School Board with Gayle Wiley's term ends

Gayle Wiley presided over her final Shelbyville Central School Board meeting last week.  It comes 24 years after she began serving on the first elected school board.

 

Wiley looked back to the beginning of her better than two decade time of service on the board.

 

 

Wiley’s start was also a historic time with the closure of two Shelbyville school buildings.

 

 

The school board member is also a teacher which has allowed her to see both sides of the process.

 

 

Wiley was presented a lamp by fellow board member Jim Rees at last week’s final regular meeting of the school year.  She says it’s bittersweet.

 

 

With the end of Wiley's term her seat will be taken by elected school board member Mike Turner.

 

City investigating traffic flow concerns on James Street near Shelby County Fairgrounds

A narrow street near the Shelby County Fairgrounds was again a topic of discussion for the City of Shelbyville’s Board of Works and Public Safety.

The city is looking into traffic flow along James St., one block north of the fairgrounds. Parking is currently allowed on both sides of the street which narrows near a 90 degree left turn at its eastern point.

A Shelbyville Central Schools bus has difficulties getting down the street with cars parking on both sides. And if the bus has difficulties then so will emergency response vehicles.

Residents along James St. have been contacted by the city to discuss removing parking from one side of the street. Several have responded that they do not have issue with that as long as it’s not their side of the street where parking is eliminated, according to city engineer John Kuntz.

 

 

At Tuesday morning’s Board of Works meeting, Gary Doremus, a resident at 947 James St. for two-plus decades, addressed the board and confirmed traffic flow issues.

James St. is nearly 24 feet wide when accessed from Frank St. but narrows to less than 21 feet across as you travel east, according to Doremus. That leaves approximately seven feet of clearance for a vehicle such as a bus when passing between two parked vehicles.

“Fire trucks and ambulances aren’t getting any smaller,” said fire chief Tony Logan, who was in attendance at the meeting. “And if you can’t get a bus down (there), we probably can’t get our vehicles down there.”

Shelbyville mayor Tom DeBaun, who is one of three members of the Board of Works, admitted he had not visited the area to see the issue first hand and wanted to do so before making a decision on eliminating parking on one side of the road.

The issue will be addressed at the final Board of Works meeting of 2021 on Jan. 28 at 8:30 a.m. at City Hall.

MHP Incident Command Covid-19 Update - December 21

Inpatient unit:  Thirty-nine of our 40 beds are occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit.  We had eighteen critical care patients at one point over the weekend, which represented 45% of our inpatients.               

  • We currently have sixteen critical care patients on the 3rd floor and eleven (69%) of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the eleven Covid-related critical care patients, only one is vaccinated.   
  • We have eight patients on ventilators, plus five additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap. 
  • Twenty-six (67%) of our inpatients are Covid positive and twenty-three (88%) of them are unvaccinated.

Emergency Department:  The Emergency Department averaged seventy-two patients each day over last three days.  This is down compared to last week when we averaged eighty-six patients per day.  Our ACC unit currently has twelve observation patients.  We have seventeen infusions scheduled today and we infused seventy patients Thursday/Friday of last week.  We have 118 doses of Regeneron remaining, but we are learning that the Omicron variant is likely resistant to the infusion drugs we have been using due to its multiple mutations.  The Omicron variant has been identified in Indiana, but the Delta variant remains the predominant strain at this time.  Omicron is expected to become the dominant strain within a few weeks.  We are awaiting additional information from the Indiana State Department of Health.

 

Urgent Care and Walk-in visits:  Priority Care is seeing up to ninety patients per day and the wait times are longer than expected.  MHP Family and Internal Medicine walk-in visits are slightly less busy, so that may be a better option for established patients.  MHP Pediatric walk-in visits are slightly less busy than last week and we are seeing a handful of Covid positive cases and an increase in the number of seasonal flu positive cases.     

 

Get your Covid vaccine at MedWorks Pharmacy:  MedWorks Pharmacy is offering the Pfizer vaccine and Pfizer booster, Johnson & Johnson vaccine and booster, as well as the Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  We request patients call to schedule an appointment for the Pediatric dosing, which is available on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Call 317-421-2020 to schedule an appointmentAll the other vaccines can be scheduled on the MHP website or by calling MedWorks directly.  https://www.mymhp.org/news-media/categories/covid-19-updates/  We accept walk-ins for the adult vaccines as well.    

Shelbyville Common Council gives second reading approval to plans for additional housing

The Shelbyville Common Council approved plans expected to add to the housing landscape in the community.  Both had received a favorable recommendation from the Plan Commission and were back before the council for a second reading.

 

On Monday morning the Common Council approved on second reading M/I Homes’ proposed Lewis Creek subdivision on Progress Parkway Planned Unit Development detailed plan and preliminary plat.

 

The approximate 60-acre parcel of land will contain 176 lots with an approximate average price range, including the lot, of $300,000.

 

The subdivision will have two access points along Progress Parkway, one north of Timber Creek Village, 990 Progress Parkway, and one south of the assisted living facility.

The development will maintain strict standards including minimum spacing between homes of 14 feet. Approximately 18 acres of the project will remain open space.

 

Lewis Creek also has playground and pickleball court amenities as well as easy access to the parkway’s pedestrian-friendly walk/bike trail.

 

M/I Homes wants to break ground in the spring of 2022 with housing availability in the summer of 2023.

 

The Common Council, also on second reading, approved a rezone of the land sitting directly behind Walmart, 2500 Progress Parkway.  The rezone is to potentially allow for residential development in the area.

 

A 17.6 acre parcel of land was zoned Business Highway but would likely not develop because of the location behind Walmart and Aldi supermarket, 2695 E. Range Road.

 

Pivot Development, LLC, out of Newport Beach, California, is proposing an apartment complex for the land that would have easy access to multiple retail options and Blue River Memorial Park.

 

The Plan Commission gave a favorable recommendation to rezone the land to Multi-Family Residential but had concerns about the proposed apartment complex.

 

Approximately 70% of the parcel is in a flood plain and cannot be developed. Pivot is proposing a multiple-building apartment complex on five acres of land that would provide nearly 120 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

 

The property has access from both Range Road and Lee Boulevard.

Indiana reports first COVID-19 case involving Omicron variant

The Indiana Department of Health (IDOH) announced that it has detected the Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus in a specimen collected from an unvaccinated Indiana resident. No additional details about the patient will be released due to privacy laws.

The variant was detected through the IDOH Laboratories’ variant surveillance program. The specimen was collected Dec. 9, and the patient was notified of the positive test. The sequencing to detect a variant was then conducted, and the Omicron variant was detected this weekend.

Indiana was one of just seven states in which Omicron had not yet been detected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The Omicron variant is the latest mutation of the virus that causes COVID-19. The World Health Organization labeled it a variant of concern on Nov. 26. Studies have shown that the variant spreads more easily and faster than the Delta variant.

The CDC says COVID-19 vaccines are expected to continue to prevent severe illness, hospitalization and death from the Omicron variant. Evidence shows that individuals who are fully vaccinated and have received a booster dose are best protected against this variant.

State Health Commissioner Kris Box, M.D., FACOG, said the latest mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 virus underscores the importance of getting vaccinated and taking other steps to prevent the spread of illness, especially as Hoosiers move indoors during the colder winter months and gather for the holidays.

“COVID-19 cases are on the rise across Indiana, and we do not want this variant to increase the burden on our already stressed healthcare system,” Box said. “While we are still learning about Omicron, we already have the tools and knowledge we need to protect ourselves and the people we love from COVID-19. I urge eligible Hoosiers to use those tools as soon as possible to limit the further spread of disease.”

The following steps can help protect Hoosiers from COVID-19, including the Omicron variant:

  • Get fully vaccinated if eligible, and get a booster if you are age 16 or older
  • Wear well-fitting masks over your nose and mouth in indoor public settings and crowded outdoor settings
  • Get tested if you have symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19
  • Stay home if you are sick
  • Wash your hands frequently
  • Avoid crowds

Individuals aged 5 and older are currently eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. To find a vaccination site, visit www.ourshot.in.gov. Pediatric sites are marked with a red pin on the map. For testing information, visiting www.coronavirus.in.gov.

Information about the Omicron variant will be added to the COVID-19 dashboard at www.coronavirus.in.gov this week.

Healthy Hoosiers Alliance and MHP to host free COVID-19 vaccination clinic with Shelbyville Mayor DeBaun and Santa

Healthy Hoosiers Alliance and Major Health Partners are teaming up to host a free COVID-19 vaccination clinic on Friday, December 17 from 6-8:00 pm in the old Chase building, 49 Public Square, Shelbyville.

 

This event is open to individuals ages 12 and over who wish to receive any of the Pfizer vaccine series (first or second vaccine dose or booster).  Individuals receiving their second vaccine or booster need to bring their vaccine card with them to confirm eligibility. 

 

This event is for walk-ins only and no prior registration is needed.

 

Looking for a chance to see Santa?  Shelbyville Mayor Tom DeBaun will also host a family friendly meet and greet with Santa on-site.

 

 

 

 

 

Shelby County trends toward 'red' on Covid-19 map; MHP update

Major Health Partners has provided an Incident Command Covid-19 Update for Thursday, December 16:

 

General update:  Since yesterday, Shelby County’s Covid positivity rate increased to 14%.  We are rapidly trending toward the “red” status. 

 

Inpatient unit: All forty of our beds remain occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit.  The ACC inpatient unit is also full, plus we have begun using our Surgical Care beds for inpatient overflow.  Some patients remained in the Emergency Department overnight because we did not have an inpatient bed available.  Several surrounding hospitals are reporting inpatient bed and emergency department diversion due to increased volumes and staff shortages.  MHP does not have any inpatient beds that are deemed unavailable due to staffing shortages.  We have redeployed several members of our physician and nursing staff to other departments in order to deal with the current inpatient surge.  MHP is no longer accepting critical care patient transfers from neighboring hospitals.            

  • We currently have sixteen critical care patients on the 3rd floor and ten (63%) of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the ten Covid-related critical care patients only one is vaccinated.   
  • We have nine patients on ventilators, plus three additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap. 
  • Thirty-two (80%) of our inpatients are Covid positive and twenty-five (78%) of them are unvaccinated.

Emergency Department:  We received eighty doses of Regeneron yesterday afternoon and have already begun administering doses to many of the eighty-seven patients on the waitlist.  We received 102 doses of Regeneron today.  We administered thirty-five patient infusions since yesterday with several more scheduled today and tomorrow.      

The infusion drugs are the 2nd best defense against severe Covid and hospitalization.  The best defense remains being fully vaccinated/boosted.  If you are not yet vaccinated, please consider it.  If you are eligible for a vaccine booster, please schedule it.  Due to supply shortages, we can no longer rely on having the infusion drugs readily available to keep Covid positive patients out of the hospital.     

 

Get your Covid vaccine at MedWorks Pharmacy:  MedWorks Pharmacy is offering the Pfizer vaccine and Pfizer booster, Johnson & Johnson vaccine and booster, as well as the Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  We request patients call to schedule an appointment for the Pediatric dosing, which is available on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Call 317-421-2020 to schedule an appointmentAll the other vaccines can be scheduled on the MHP website or by calling MedWorks directly.  https://www.mymhp.org/news-media/categories/covid-19-updates/  We accept walk-ins for the adult vaccines as well.    

Shelbyville PD announce end of Silver Alert for Luther Noel

The Shelbyville Police Department has posted the following announcement:

 

The Silver Alert has been canceled and we are no longer searching for Mr. Luther Noel.

 

Additional information will be released as the investigation continues.

 

Thank you,

Lt. Michael Turner

Accelerate Rural Indiana receives $20 million in READI funds for local projects

Fifty million dollars would have gone a long way to improving Indiana’s Interstate 74 southeast corridor. Twenty million dollars is still a good starting point.

The Regional Economic Acceleration & Development Initiative divvied up $500 million Tuesday across the state to 17 regional groups.

Accelerate Rural Indiana, the group including Shelbyville and Shelby County touting the I-74 southeast corridor, was seeking the maximum award of $50 million, but will settle for $20 million.

“We really didn’t know what to expect,” said Shelbyville Mayor Tom DeBaun. “We didn’t know if we would get $50 million or what a realistic dollar figure was.

“We’re happy with it ($20 million). It will be impactful. It provides opportunities for a lot of projects that might not happen.”

The next question becomes what does Accelerate Rural Indiana, which includes Shelbyville, Rushville, Greensburg and Batesville as well as Shelby County, Rush County and Decatur County, do with $20 million?

Accelerate Rural Indiana’s presentation to the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) highlighted 40 prospective projects based on five priority areas: Housing, Quality of Life, Education and Workforce Development, Public Infrastructure, and Regional Marketing.

Those 40 projects represented a total investment of $866 million in the southeast corridor of Interstate 74.

“We will have to sit down as a group and go from there,” said DeBaun. “I will meet with Brian Asher (of the Shelby County Development Corporation) and we will set our priorities for the Shelby County projects. We still need guidance from the state how the projects should be selected.”

Accelerate Rural Indiana consists of 16 members from each of the respective cities and counties involved. DeBaun, Shelby County Commissioner Don Parker, Asher and Deb Tracy, also of the SCDC, represent Shelbyville and Shelby County.

Jennifer Jones of the Blue River Community Foundation is one of four members on the group’s Oversight Committee.

DeBaun labeled the presentation preparation as grueling at the SCDC’s annual meeting in November but the silver lining of the process is a new line of communication has opened with neighboring communities.

“We have valued the process,” said DeBaun. “Getting better working relationships with all these folks is important.”

There were nine projects from Shelbyville and Shelby County in Accelerate Rural Indiana’s presentation.

  • Porter Apartments ($29.5 million investment)
  • Blue River Trails Housing Expansion in Morristown ($24.25 million)
  • Housing near NW Consolidated Schools ($53.75 million)
  • Indoor Sports Complex ($21 million)
  • Early Learning Center ($8 million)
  • Shelby County Fairground Lighting ($350,000)
  • Chase Building ($1 million)
  • Pleasant View Commerce Park ($114 million)
  • Tom Hession Drive Expansion ($364 million)

DeBaun would like to see the Early Learning Center be a priority.

The community is lacking in quality day care and pre-school offerings for youth ages 0-5. A study showed 70% of Shelby County youth are not kindergarten ready when they reach that point.

That brought the creation of Early Learning Shelby County (ELSC), funded by both city and county government bodies. ELSC has a concept for a standalone childcare facility at Intelliplex Park that would provide quality childcare and preschool learning.

“I believe the early learning center should be our highest priority because it is the most impactful,” said DeBaun. “It can break the generational cycle of not being undereducated and underskilled later in life.”

Each community will fight for its projects. That process could be made simpler if the IEDC provides guidelines for how each of the 17 groups should spend their funding.

Five of the 17 groups received $50 million – Southwest Indiana Regional Development Authority, Our Southern Indiana, South Bend, Northeast, and Northwest Indiana.

“I would like to know how they came up with the formula (for distributing $500 million) or the rationale considering we had the second highest return on investment of the proposals,” said DeBaun.

Four of the proposals with central Indiana ties each received $20 million.

“That is curious to me,” said DeBaun. “They hit South Bend, Gary, Fort Wayne and Evansville really hard but the areas around central Indiana got $20 million. I would like to know how they decided it.”

There is potential for more funding in 2023, according to DeBaun. That could have an impact on what local projects get immediate funding.

Silver Alert: Luther Noel, 89, of Shelbyville

The Shelbyville Police Department is investigating the disappearance of Luther Noel, an 89 year old white male, 5 feet 2 inches tall, 112 pounds with gray hair and gray eyes, last seen wearing a blue flannel shirt with maroon suspenders and blue pants.

 

Luther is missing from Shelbyville, Indiana and was last seen on Wednesday, December 15, at 7:30 pm. He is believed to be in extreme danger and may require medical assistance. 

 

If you have any information on Luther Noel, contact the Shelbyville Police Department at 317-392-2511 or 911.

Gov. Holcomb announces all Hoosiers taxpayers to receive a tax refund

Governor Eric J. Holcomb announced an estimated 4.3 million taxpayers will receive a $125 refund after they file their 2021 taxes.

 

“Despite a pandemic, Indiana exceeded all expectations and closed the state fiscal year with an unprecedented amount in reserves,” said Gov. Holcomb. “We have an obligation to put this money back in the hands of taxpayers instead of leaving it in the hands of government.”

 

An estimated $545 million will be returned to Hoosiers after taxpayers file their 2021 state taxes. The Governor is working with leaders of the general assembly on legislation that will streamline the process and make an additional 910,000 taxpayers eligible for the credit. The typical taxpayer liability is approximately $1000. This payment represents a 12-13% one-time tax cut.

 

Once legislation passes, the Department of Revenue (DOR) will begin processing payments for taxpayers.

 

The form of taxpayer payments will be based on how the 2021return was filed. Taxpayers who apply for an extension will receive the payment after filing their return.

 

DOR expects to complete refunds for taxpayers filing by the April 18, 2022, filing deadline by May 1, 2022. Once the details are finalized DOR will provide additional information in 2022.

Plan Commission approves preliminary plat for new Lewis Creek subdivision

Lot interest is already building for a new Shelbyville subdivision that will not start construction until the spring of 2022.

M/I Homes’ proposed Lewis Creek subdivision on Progress Parkway received Plan Commission unanimous approval Wednesday night at City Hall for its Planned Unit Development detailed plan and preliminary plat. M/I Homes will return before the city’s Common Council for final approval.

The approximate 60-acre parcel of land will contain 176 lots (photo) with an approximate average price range, including the lot, of $300,000.

The subdivision will have two access points along Progress Parkway, one north of Timber Creek Village, 990 Progress Parkway, and one south of the assisted living facility.

The development will maintain strict standards including minimum spacing between homes of 14 feet. Approximately 18 acres of the project will remain open space.

Lewis Creek also has playground and pickleball court amenities as well as easy access to the parkway’s pedestrian-friendly walk/bike trail.

M/I Homes wants to break ground in the spring of 2022 with housing availability in the summer of 2023.

Tim Westerfield of M/I Homes informed the Plan Commission that there is already interest in at least five of the lots.

The Plan Commission also approved the preliminary plat and site development plan for a metal recycling facility located in the city’s industrial park.

Trinity Alloys, LLC plans to construct a 59,000 square foot metal recycling warehouse at 885 Col. W.T. Conner Way.

A rezone of the land sitting directly behind Walmart, 2500 Progress Parkway, was approved to potentially allow for residential development in the area.

A 17.6 acre parcel of land was zoned Business Highway but would likely not develop because of the location behind Walmart and Aldi supermarket, 2695 E. Range Road.

Pivot Development, LLC, out of Newport Beach, California, is proposing an apartment complex for the land that would have easy access to multiple retail options and Blue River Memorial Park.

The Plan Commission gave a favorable recommendation to rezone the land to Multi-Family Residential but had concerns about the proposed apartment complex.

Approximately 70% of the parcel is in a flood plain and cannot be developed. Pivot is proposing a multiple-building apartment complex on five acres of land that would provide nearly 120 one- and two-bedroom apartments.

The property has access from both Range Road and Lee Boulevard.

MHP Incident Command Covid Update - December 15

Major Health Partners Incident Command Shelby County Covid Update for December 15, 2021:
 

General update and positivity rate:  The State of Indiana’s hospitalization rate is currently the highest it has been throughout the pandemic.  Experts are predicting this current surge will last through January 2022 before receding.  Indiana’s Covid positivity rate is at 14.1% and Shelby County’s positivity rate is 13.6%.  Shelby County’s positivity rate represents an increase compared to the prior reporting period.  Shelby County’s rise in Covid positivity rate places us in the “orange” category and only slightly below the threshold for the “red” category.  MHP Pediatrics immunized 87 pediatric patients last Saturday with the Pfizer pediatric dose during its Covid vaccination clinic.   

      

MHP Priority Care and primary care walk-ins:  Walk-in volumes at our locations continue to remain well above normal volumes.  Priority Care is averaging 70-90 urgent care patients per day.  MHP Family & Internal Medicine is seeing 30-40 walk-in patients per day.  MHP Pediatrics is seeing 55-80+ walk-in patients per day, which is well above our average.  Longer wait times may occur due to higher volumes.  We are also experiencing significant supply chain shortages for Covid testing across the enterprise.    

 

Emergency Department:  The Emergency Department is seeing between 80-90+ patients per day over the last several days, which remains well above our normal volumes.  There has also been an increase in Covid infusion referrals.  We have zero remaining doses of Regeneron and we hope to receive 80 additional doses soon.  The infusion waitlist for patients has grown significantly.  We do not have an anticipated ship date for additional Regeneron doses at this time. 

The infusion drugs are the 2nd best defense against severe Covid and hospitalization.  The best defense remains being fully vaccinated/boosted.  If you are not yet vaccinated, please consider it.  If you are eligible for a vaccine booster, please schedule it.  Due to supply shortages, we can no longer rely on having the infusion drugs readily available to keep Covid positive patients out of the hospital.     

 

Get your Covid vaccine at MedWorks Pharmacy:  MedWorks Pharmacy is offering the Pfizer vaccine and Pfizer booster, Johnson & Johnson vaccine and booster, as well as the Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  We request patients call to schedule an appointment for the Pediatric dosing, which is available on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Call 317-421-2020 to schedule an appointmentAll the other vaccines can be scheduled on the MHP website or by calling MedWorks directly.  https://www.mymhp.org/news-media/categories/covid-19-updates/  We accept walk-ins for the adult vaccines as well.   

 

Inpatient unit: All forty of our beds are occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit.  Several surrounding hospitals are reporting inpatient bed and emergency department diversion due to increased volumes and staff shortages.   

We currently have fourteen critical care patients on the 3rd floor and nine of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the nine Covid-related critical care patients only one is vaccinated.   

We have eight patients on ventilators, plus five additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap. 

Twenty-nine (73%) of our inpatients are Covid positive and twenty-three (79%) of them are unvaccinated.

 

Shelbyville Central votes to extend mask mandate to Feb 2

Shelbyville schools will continue with a mask mandate into the next calendar year when school resumes after Christmas break.

 

The school board approved a February 2 target date at its meeting Wednesday.

Superintendent Mary Harper says a sizable percentage of teachers support going back to optional masks.  But concerns about contact tracing without masks taking more and more kids out of school drove the board to its vote Wednesday.

 

 

Harper says evidence of past holiday experience coupled with the Christmas break was a factor.

 

 

Many have complained over what they feel is a contradiction in how Shelbyville Central deals with Covid when going mask – optional during extracurricular and athletic events.  Harper says enforcing the mandate at those was extremely difficult.

 

 

The February 2 date still allows for the board to discuss the issue again, if needed, at its January meeting.

Triton Central senior surprised with Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship

Corbin Maurice thought he was in trouble. Or, about to be sent home because of COVID-19 contact tracing protocols.

The Triton Central senior’s sensory perceptions heightened even more Wednesday morning when he walked down the hallway with principal Cary Chandler and saw his parents waiting outside the school office.

The next 20 seconds were almost surreal.

Julie Alvis, Communications and Scholarship Director at the Blue River Community Foundation, stepped out of a nearby doorway and handed Maurice a plaque honoring him as the 2022 Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship recipient for Shelby County.

With the honor and the plaque comes a full tuition scholarship for four years of undergraduate study at an Indiana college or university.

“For Corbin to receive this is phenomenal for him and for his family,” said Chandler, who helped pull off the surprise announcement. “When you get to know Corbin and his history and what he has done, he is just a worthy recipient. He has done a phenomenal job throughout his four years here. We will miss him tremendously next year.”

 

 

Maurice is the son of Michael and Amber Maurice, a Beech Grove police officer and Triton Central Middle School guidance counselor, respectively.

Maurice was surprised when Chandler asked him if there was something he wanted to tell him as they walked down the hall. Then his parents appeared as well as foundation staff members that were part of the interview process.

“That’s when my apprehension turned to excitement,” he said.

There were 40 scholarship applicants from the five high schools in Shelby County. The foundation’s scholarship committee surveyed the applications without names to avoid bias then selected five for interviews.

Joining Corbin in the final pool were Southwestern’s Maggie Goodin, Shelbyville’s Braydon Povinelli and Waldron’s Hadlie Ross and Hallie Ross – the first time twins advanced together into the interview phase, according to Alvis.

“A friend of mine was a finalist last year so I thought it was awesome to be with the same people I looked up to,” said Maurice about learning he was a finalist. “Even if this is as far as I make it, I am grateful for this opportunity to be able to represent Triton Central as a student and for all they have done for me.”

Maurice is in the top five of his graduating class at Triton Central and is active in Student Council (executive president), National Honor Society (president), Student Mentor Program, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Future Farmers of America as well as the Robotics Club, Chess Club and History Club. Maurice also is a member of the cross country and track and field teams at TC.

There are academic scholarship offers to weigh from competing schools but Maurice has the educational track he wants to pursue available at Purdue University in West Lafayette.

“I will wait a month or so for the decision,” he said. “There are a lot of factors to consider now. Obviously, this scholarship and the others I receive make it easier. Now it’s about where do I really want to be for the future?”

Maurice wants to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Chemistry then attend graduate school to get a masters degree in Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology. The goal is to one day do research at a pharmaceutical company.

The other four finalists will receive a four-year renewable scholarship from one of the 95 scholarship funds administered by Blue River Community Foundation.

Lilly Endowment Inc. created the scholarship program for the Class of 1999 and has supported the program every year since with tuition grants totaling in excess of $439 million. More than 5,000 Indiana students, 41 from Shelby County, have received the scholarship since the program’s inception.

 

 

Maurice fully understands what it means to be a recipient of the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship and what it will do for his future.

“My parents, in the most loving way possible, have said they are not paying for my college,” he said. “It’s awesome to have that burden taken off me. I know no matter what, I will be able to figure something out and I will end up where I am meant to be. This takes a lot of stress out of my future.

“Now it’s what can I start saving for that I would have had to save for college to benefit my future? Whether it is for graduate school or putting down payments on a house or car in the future. So many things five and 10 years down the line can come so much easier because of the community and all they are doing for me.”

Greensburg man killed in Ripley Co. one-car crash

A Decatur County man was killed in a Tuesday one-car crash.

 

The crash occurred on US 50 in Ripley County about 7:45 pm Tuesday. A 2010 Chevrolet Equinox, driven by George Meadors, 54, of Greensburg, was traveling eastbound on US 50 near Cave Hill Road, just east of Versailles.  For an unknown reason, Meadors’ vehicle left the south side of the road and struck a tree. The  vehicle then caught fire. 

 

Meadors sustained fatal injuries in the crash.  He was pronounced deceased at the scene by the Ripley County Coroner. 

 

The crash remains under investigation.  It is unknown if alcohol or drugs were a factor in the crash although toxicology results are pending.

 

US 50 was closed for approximately three hours for crash investigation and cleanup.

Search warrant results in multiple arrests, seizure of drugs, firearms at Shelby Co. home

A search warrant led to arrests following a drug investigation by the Shelby County Narcotics Task Force.

 

On Tuesday morning, a search warrant was executed at a Shelby County residence at 8944 W. State Rd. 44, Franklin. This is the second search warrant executed at
this location in the past 90 days.

 

The warrant was for illegal narcotics and firearms as part of an extensive investigation by the Shelby County Narcotics Task Force. During execution of the search warrant, four individuals were arrested for multiple charges.

 

Joseph Gamill, 52, of Franklin for dealing in methamphetamine - a Level 2 felony, dealing in a narcotic drug - Level 2 felony, traffic with an inmate - Level 5 felony, possession of methamphetamine  - Level 5 felony

 

Angela Hayes, 45, of Franklin for dealing in methamphetamine - Level 2 felony, dealing in a narcotic drug - Level 2 felony, possession of methamphetamine - Level 6 felony

 

Paul Rose, 60, of Franklin for possession of methamphetamine  - Level 6 felony, maintaining a common nuisance - Level 6 felony

 

Larry Lee , 56, of Franklin for possession of a firearm by a serious violent felon a - Level 4 felony, possession of methamphetamine - Level 5 felony, resisting law enforcement - Class A misdemeanor.

 

As a result of the warrant methamphetamine, heroin, fentanyl and six firearms
were recovered.

 

The Shelbyville SWAT Team, Shelby County Sheriff’s Department, Shelbyville
Police Department and Indiana Department of Natural Resources assisted in the execution of the warrant Tuesday.

Man shot, another arrested in Bartholomew County shooting

Bartholomew County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the report of a person shot Monday evening, at Sunny Brook Mobile Home Park, 10202 E Legal Tender Rd, Elizabethtown.  

 

Don Brown, 52, of Elizabethtown, suffered three gunshot wounds.  He was flown via medical helicopter to a hospital in Indianapolis for treatment.  Brown’s condition remains unknown at this time.

 

Ethan Sherfield, 21, of Nineveh, was located nearby by deputies.  He was identified by witnesses at the scene as the shooter and was detained pending investigation.  He was later remanded to the Bartholomew County Jail on preliminary charges of Battery resulting in serious bodily injury (a level 5 felony) and Intimidation with a deadly weapon (a level 6 felony)

 

Sherfield remains in jail in lieu of $22,500 bond.

 

No information has been released on what led to the shooting.  The investigation  is still ongoing and anyone with information is asked to contact the Bartholomew County Sheriff’s Office.

Accelerate Rural Indiana excitement may be somewhat subdued by READI announcement

17 regions presented gameplans to the Indiana Economic Development Corporation with $500 million in READI funds on the line to help fund and bring investment to attract residents and businesses.

 

On Tuesday, the grants were unveiled.  The Accelerate Rural Indiana group, which included Shelbyville and Shelby County, will receive $20 million.

 

Shelby County Development Corporation Executive Director Brian Asher.

 

 

$20 million is a lot of money.  But it's far from the maximum of $50 million available.  Five regions received the max including a region of northwestern Indiana and clusters in the Evansville, Fort Wayne, South Bend and New Albany areas.

 

 

Asher says the partners in the Accelerate Rural Indiana region will now meet to address how to use those funds.

 

 

The 70-40 Greater Mt. Comfort Corridor, led by the Hancock County Economic Development Council featuring Hancock and Marion counties received $5 million.

 

Shelbyville, Shelby Co. to share in $20 million in READI funds

Accelerate Rural Indiana, comprised of Shelbyville, Shelby County, Rushville, Greensburg, Rush and Decatur counties and Batesville received $20 million in announced READI funds today.

 

$50 million was requested from the $500 million being made available to 17 presenting regional groups.  Each group was presented funds.

 

More on this story Wednesday on GIANT fm News and Shelby County Post.

 

Shelby County Judge Kent Apsley interested in current media cameras courtroom experiment

Judges in five Indiana courtrooms will allow news media to use cameras under a pilot project announced by the state Supreme Court.

 

The four-month experiment started this month and could be extended, the court said.  All civil and criminal proceedings will be eligible for broadcast by news media.  Exceptions could include hearings closed to the public.

 

Kent Apsley was elected judge of Shelby County Superior Court 1 in 2014.  He says he’s never had media cameras in the courtroom.  Although there has been expedited use of technology with the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

 

Apsley says the experiment allows for media cameras in the courtroom, or even use of security cameras already in place that could be used by the media.

 

 

There will be some restrictions on the use of cameras, especially if police informants, undercover officers, children or certain other witnesses are testifying.

 

Various hearings have been streamed and viewed by the public during the pandemic.  However, recording of the hearings has been prohibited.

 

Judge Apsley notes many Indiana local courtrooms are small.  Making room for media may have its own complications but allowing the media could also mean more people can witness court events.

 

 

Judge Apsley notes the rights of different parties, particularly those in the courtroom compared to the public’s right to know can conflict.

 

 

Judge Apsley says he knows the judges involved.

 

 

The judges involved in the current experiment are Frances Gull in Allen Superior Court; Marianne Vorhees in Delaware Circuit Court; Bruce Parent in Lake Superior Court; Sean Persin in Tippecanoe Circuit Court; Leslie Shively in Vanderburgh Superior Court.

 

READI winners to be announced this afternoon

Governor Eric Holcomb with join Secretary of Commerce Brad Chambers at the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) board meeting to announce the READI awards for the 17 regions that submitted proposals.

 

The governor will chair a joint public meeting of the board of directors of the IEDC and the Indiana Economic Development Foundation.

 

Ten of the 17 presenting READI groups are to be chosen for $50 million towards growing their region and business investment.

 

The announcement is scheduled for 4:00 pm today.

 

 

 

Shelby County's Becky Miller receives Prosecuting Council's 2021 Victim Advocate of the Year Award

Shelby County Prosecutor’s Office Victim Assistance Coordinator Becky Miller was chosen to receive the Indiana Prosecuting Attorney’s Council (IPAC) 2021 Victim Advocate of the Year Award. 

 

Miller received the award during a ceremony at the Hyatt Regency in Indianapolis on Monday.

 

Miller was nominated for the award by Shelby County Prosecutor Brad Landwerlen, who made the presentation, along with IPAC Executive Director Chris Naylor.  Landwerlen told the audience some of the reasons that Miller was chosen for the award, pointing out that she had survived a violent relationship.  Miller refused to be forever defined as a victim, and, after eight years of working through other people’s victimization issues while working for the DCS, joined the Shelby County Prosecutor’s Office, where she has been the Victim Assistance Coordinator for 11 years.  Her personal experience, combined with her experiences while working with troubled families at DCS, gave her a hard-earned special ability and drive to help victims.

 

Landwerlen also says Miller is not only excellent at providing resources, assistance, and guidance to victims (or serving as a willing ear at times of need), but she performs various other acts that are above and beyond the requirements of her job as well.  She organizes an annual Victim Vigil, where various victims and surviving family members of victims lost, both local and from across central Indiana, attend for a time of remembrance.  She oversees a cell phone program in which people donate their old cell phones, which she digitally wipes and then distributes to the hospital and to police officers to give to victims who don’t have a phone, whose phone is taken by their abuser, or whose phone must be taken temporarily by police as part of the investigation. 

 

Becky Miller is also an active member of the Sex Abuse Response Team and is voluntarily on-call 24 hours per day, often responding in the middle of the evening, and sometimes even accompanying victims in the exam room.  She also organizes the Prosecutor’s Anti-Drug Calendar project each year, and works various projects with Turning Point to benefit victims.  She regularly performs other tasks to help victims – such as recently working to find a therapist who would go to a victim’s home, because the victim was too traumatized by the crime to leave home to get the much-needed therapy.

 

The Shelby County Prosecutor says he is proud to have Becky as a part of their team, and of all she does to help crime victims through the most difficult times in their lives.  Her empathy, compassion, and dedication to victims know no bounds.  She truly makes Shelby County a better place.  This award was well-earned.

 

Shelby County Co-op transitioning out of hardware store business

Shelby County Co-op is transitioning out of the hardware store business.  But another planned transition could mean a strong starting position for someone else.

 

Shelby County Co-op General Manager / CEO Denny Frey says clearance sales are underway at Ace Hardware, 2350 East State Road 44, in Shelbyville.  Frey says a new retailer could be staked to a strong head start.

 

The Shelby County Co-op board decided Ace Hardware was a part of the business that took too much time for the profit that was turned.  However, before the decision was made to proceed with closing the business it appeared the longtime Ace Hardware might continue under a different name.  Frey says True Value offered a lucrative deal to become the name above the door with a package that included reimaging, advertising and products.  The negotiations with True Value came as the board expressed concern that Ace Hardware wasn’t showing much support to the local store.

 

After approval of a transition to True Value, Frey says the board then decided to go ahead with leaving the hardware store business anyway.  But the True Value offer could be used by a new retailer at the site as it is allowed for the co-op to sub-contract.

 

 

Ace Hardware is currently advertising 10 percent off clearance items in the store.  Gradually, other sales offers will be announced over time going into 2022.

 

Frey says the co-op has job positions available for Ace Hardware employees to potentially stay with Shelby County Co-op.

Covid cases, hospitilizations on the rise; MHP to host pediatric vaccination clinic Saturday

References to Indiana county - coded reds and oranges and coronavirus dashboards have been fewer in recent days.  That appears to be changing as half of Indiana’s counties are now in the highest-risk level of COVID-19 spread and hospitalizations are reportedly up 25% in the past week.

 

The Indiana Department of Health says 46 of the state’s 92 counties are in the highest-risk red category.  All other counties in the state are listed as orange except for Crawford in extreme southern Indiana which is in the lower-risk yellow.

 

Shelby, Decatur, Hancock and Johnson counties remain orange this week.  Neighboring Rush and Bartholomew counties are red. 

 

It's the largest number of high-risk counties since last winter when 73 had red ratings in early January.  Indiana only had three counties in red when the month of November started.

 

MHP Covid Incident Command Report

 

Pediatric Covid Vaccine Clinic: A Pediatric Covid Vaccination Clinic will be held Saturday, December 11, 8AM-2PM. We will administer the newly approved Covid vaccine for ages 5-11, which is one-third of the adult dose.  We will also administer the Covid vaccine for pediatric patients ages 12+.  Please call MHP Pediatrics (317) 398-7337 to schedule your vaccine appointment.

 

Covid testing positivity rate:  Indiana’s Covid positivity rate is at 14.7% and Shelby County’s positivity rate is 12.5%.  Both represent a substantial increase compared to the prior reporting period.  Shelby County’s rise in Covid positivity rate places us in the “orange” category.     

 

MHP Priority Care and primary care walk-ins Walk-in volumes at our locations are continuing to increase.  Priority Care is averaging 70+ urgent care patients per day.  MHP Family and Internal Medicine is seeing 45+ walk-in patients per day.  MHP Pediatrics is seeing 85+ walk-in patients per day, which is well above our average.  We are experiencing significant supply chain shortages for Covid testing across the enterprise.   

  

Emergency Department:  The Emergency Department is seeing between 71-75 patients per day over the last several days, which remains above our normal volumes.  There has also been an increase in Covid infusion referrals.  We are averaging over twenty Regeneron infusions per day.  We have 3 remaining doses of Regeneron and we hope to receive additional doses soon.  We do not have an anticipated ship date.  The infusion drugs are the 2nd best defense against severe Covid and hospitalization.  The best defense remains being fully vaccinated.  If you are not yet vaccinated, please consider it.  If you are eligible for a vaccine booster, please schedule it.  Due to supply shortages, we can no longer rely on having the infusion drugs readily available to keep Covid positive patients out of the hospital.     

 

Get your Covid vaccine at MedWorks Pharmacy MedWorks Pharmacy is offering the Pfizer vaccine and Pfizer booster, Johnson & Johnson vaccine and booster, as well as the Pediatric Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.  We request patients call to schedule an appointment for the Pediatric dosing, which is available on Wednesdays and Fridays.  Call 317-421-2020 to schedule an appointmentAll the other vaccines can be scheduled on the MHP website or by calling MedWorks directly.  https://www.mymhp.org/news-media/categories/covid-19-updates/  We accept walk-ins for the adult vaccines as well.   

 

Inpatient unit: Thirty-seven of our 40 beds are occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit.  

  • We currently have ten critical care patients on the 3rd floor and seven of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the seven Covid-related critical care patients only one is vaccinated.   
  • We have two patients on ventilators, plus six additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap. 
  • Nineteen of our inpatients are Covid positive and thirteen of them are unvaccinated.

Van Til hired as new Shelbyville parks department director

Kentucky native Rob Van Til has been hired as the new director of the Shelbyville Parks and Recreation Department.

Van Til has worked for the Decatur County Family YMCA in Greensburg, Indiana, since early 2019 and was the associate executive director before accepting a position in Shelbyville that has not been vacant in over two decades.

Karen Martin retired Oct. 12 as parks department director – a position she held for 22 years.

Van Til will officially start Jan. 3 but will be in attendance at today’s parks board meeting – the final one of 2021.

“For me, it’s my opportunity to put my own stamp on an organization that is an important part of the community,” said Van Til Wednesday morning.

Originally from Michigan but raised in Williamstown, Kentucky, Van Til has a degree in Communications from the University of Kentucky. A career in sports journalism or radio was on his radar until a stint working for a YMCA summer camp altered his thinking.

“I started working with kids and that changed what I wanted to do,” he said. “I worked at a summer camp when I was 19 and it sucks you in. I could see the impact it had on the community and how it can affect lives. And I just kept getting opportunities after that.”

Van Til played two years of NAIA college basketball before transferring to the University of Kentucky.

Before moving to Greensburg, he worked for a YMCA in central Kentucky.

With a newly-opened YMCA in Shelbyville, Van Til’s operational experience within that organization will prove vital in creating a working relationship with the parks department.

“I hope it will. I look forward to having discussions with them so that we don’t overlap (programs),” he said.

Van Til will step into the leadership role at the parks department with an experienced staff in place.

“That excited me (about the job), that there is a long-time staff of people invested in Shelby County,” he said.

Directing parks department programs such as camps, the preschool, and sports leagues will feel familiar to Van Til based on his YMCA experience.

Learning how to manage city parks will be an early focus in his tenure.

“Both (YMCA and the parks department) operate similarly, the difference is in keeping up the parks and the management of staff,” he said.

Van Til and his wife, Sarah, have a 5-year-old daughter named Emma.

Former Coca-Cola plant to be anchor piece for mixed use development project

Land developers continue to flock to Shelby County, spurred by strong economic development, the need to house a potential growth in the workforce, and the modern redevelopment of Shelbyville’s Public Square.

On Monday at the City of Shelbyville’s Common Council meeting, real estate developer Birge & Held is the latest to arrive with the proposed creation of “The Mill”—a $34 million mixed income development that would have both commercial and residential components just north of downtown Shelbyville.

The anchor point of the project is the former Coca-Cola plant at 405 N. Harrison St. (photo), next to the Porter Center which currently houses the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce.

The Coca-Cola building has already been purchased and Birge & Held is in the process of purchasing the land behind the Porter Center – the former site of Porter Pool – where an H-shaped apartment complex will sit.

“We want to restore the (Coca-Cola) build to its former glory,” said Sam Rogers, Vice President of Development for Birge & Held.

 

 

The project envisions approximately 15,000 square feet of the Coca-Cola building will be commercial, perhaps a restaurant or brewery along N. Harrison St. leading into downtown, with office space and lounge areas in the back half of the building.

With another 13,000 square feet behind the Coca-Cola building and the Porter Center, The Mill will have between 160-172 units featuring studio, 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom apartments with easy access to the Blue River Trail and within walking distance of the Public Square.

There are still several hurdles to clear including bringing the Coca-Cola building up to safety codes. Full financial closing on the deal is slated for June of 2022.

Construction completion is estimated as November of 2023.

 

 

“It’s a super exciting project for us. We don’t often have something as awesome as the Coca-Cola building to start with and to inspire us to create something that continues that design idea,” said Craig McCormick, project architect with Blackline Studios.

Several members of the Common Council expressed their excitement for the project that will preserve the history of an existing building and add more housing opportunities near downtown.

In other council business Monday night, the Common Council recommended John Hartnett, the retired former director of the Shelbyville Boys and Girls Club, for the Economic Development Commission.

The three-member commission has been restarted after a nearly decade-long hiatus. The commission’s role is to handle public hearings on bonds and review documents for economic development projects.

The three members are appointed by the Shelby County Council, the City of Shelbyville’s Common Council and the Mayor.

The county council appointed T.J. Titus at its November meeting. Titus is the son of Shelby County Council president Tony Titus.

Mayor Tom DeBaun appointed Shannon Meredith, a local legal assistant.

The council also approved rezoning approximately 17 acres located behind Walmart, 2500 Progress Parkway, along Lee Boulevard to multi-family residential for pending project for an apartment complex that has not yet been formally discussed with city officials.

Santa Protectors provide holiday joy to 20 Shelby County youth

One by one selected Shelby County elementary students walked into Walmart Saturday morning accompanied by an emergency responder.

After a one-year hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Santa Protectors was back to a full slate of activities in 2021 that included helping area youth.

“I am in my 15th year and I’ve been involved with it since I came in,” said Shelbyville firefighter Jared Wilson, who spearheads the effort in Shelby County. “This is the greatest day of the year. Last year, we didn’t get to do it so it was abnormal for everybody. This is the time of year where everybody puts everything aside and comes in here as one.

“This is the greatest day of the year for us, the police department, the fire department and everybody involved. We love it.”

Santa Protectors contacts local schools seeking youth that need holiday assistance. This year, 20 boys and girls were selected to spend the day with local emergency responders and have a shopping spree.

The morning started with breakfast at fire station No. 1 in downtown Shelbyville.

 

Jeff Brown photos

A fleet of emergency response vehicles filled a section of the Shelbyville Walmart parking lot Saturday morning for the Santa Protectors shopping spree. (Top photo): Mike Cleveland, with the Shelby County Sheriff's Department, shops with Trey, age 9, to find some toys to purchase. Cleveland was joined by his wife, Kristina, to assist Trey in making his holiday selections.

 

The boys and girls were then loaded in emergency responder vehicles for a parade across town to Walmart, lights flashing and sirens blaring.

Once inside Walmart, each youth and designated emergency responder had $200 to spend on clothes, winter apparel and toys.

Once shopping was completed, the youth were returned to the firehouse for a catered lunch.

In 2020, emergency responders had to shop without the designated youth because of pandemic protocols. The gifts were then delivered to each family.

The 2021 event included members of the Shelbyville Police Department, Shelby County Sheriff’s Department, numerous volunteer departments in the county and, of course, the Shelbyville Fire Department.

Wilson found organizing the 2021 event came quite easy.

“We have groups that want to help every year,” said Wilson. “The Tri Kappa sorority in town takes care of all our food. They provide lunch and drinks and Bill Moore at Linne’s (Bakery) generously donated the donuts for breakfast.

“A lot of organizations and businesses in town look forward to helping, not only the tangibles but monetarily as well. We don’t really have to ask for donations. There are times they come in willingly and we don’t have to seek anything.”

Governor Holcomb calling for lowering of flags for Sen. Bob Dole

Governor Eric J. Holcomb is directing flags to be flown at half-staff to honor the life of Senator Bob Dole.

 

Flags should be flown at half-staff at the Indiana Statehouse immediately until sunset on Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021.

 

Gov. Holcomb also asks businesses and residents to lower their flags to half-staff.

Santa Claus strolls into downtown Shelbyville for holiday celebration

Surrounded by a large crowd in downtown Shelbyville, Santa and Mrs. Claus walked into the heart of the city Friday night to kick off the holiday season.

On an unusually warm early December evening, the City of Shelbyville showed off its nearly complete downtown redevelopment project that has taken three years to finish.

After the vintage fire truck that was bringing Santa to downtown sputtered and came to a stop about a block north of the Public Square, Mayor Tom DeBaun and Fire Chief Tony Logan escorted Santa and Mrs. Claus through the large crowd to the front of the former Chase Bank building.

With a countdown from five, the crowd counted down to the holiday lights firing up. Santa and Mrs. Claus then headed into the Chase Bank building to meet with children.

The renovated 100-year-old Julius Joseph Fountain is now surrounded by lights illuminating downtown businesses open on a Friday night and welcoming local residents back to the Public Square.

 

 

“What I see is literally hundreds if not thousands of people down here enjoying themselves, smiling and enjoying the environment,” said DeBaun after leaving Santa and Mrs. Claus to talk with the children. “There are kids playing in the grass in the plaza. Everybody is enjoying the space exactly the way we intended it to be enjoyed.

“I’ve been doing the parade since 2001, so for 20 years of experience minus the COVID year (2020), 19 years of experience and this is the biggest one I’ve seen. Everybody is happy and smiling and utilizing the space just like we said they would.”

Residents started gathering downtown at 5 p.m. Friday as the Mistletoe Market and the temporary ice skating rink opened for business. Carriage rides circled the downtown area as people arrived to enjoy the holiday season.

The parade departed the Porter Center north of the Public Square at 7 p.m. and worked its way into the downtown area.

 

 

A rolling calliope, cars and trucks full of scouts and princesses, jeeps and large trucks adorned with lights, and the Shelbyville marching band all showed up to celebrate in downtown Shelbyville.

The downtown redevelopment project started in 2019 along East Washington Street then rolled into 2020 where West Washington Street was modernized and a downtown parking garage started to rise. Work within the Public Square also commenced in 2020 with the bulk of the above ground work completed in 2021.

Workers spent Friday morning cleaning up to move out and let local residents enjoy the fruits of their labor. And downtown businesses opened their doors for the foot traffic that was readily interested in revisiting the downtown area.

“The businesses have been very patient. They have put up with a lot the last two years and we are really grateful to them for hanging in,” said DeBaun. “The good news is, I had two potential businesses looking at a building downtown that came tonight just to see this event. I met with them early this evening and they were amazed with what we’ve done here. We show very well and all our businesses are starting to thrive and we are meeting with new prospective tenants regularly.”

 

 

There were issues with crowding along the parade route, especially at the right turn off North Harrison Street to West Washington Street. DeBaun admitted last month that the first major downtown event in two years was a “test” event for the logistics of a new look downtown.

“Those are things we will talk about,” said DeBaun. “We will have a debrief in the next couple of weeks. It’s new with this space and we will figure it out. All things considered, it went really well.”

 

 

Virtual job fair to feature four long-term care providers with presence throughout state

The Indiana Department of Workforce Development, in partnership with the Indiana Health Care Association and the Indiana Center for Assisted Living, is hosting a virtual job fair featuring four long-term care providers that are hiring statewide.

Long-term care providers American Senior Communities, CarDon, Gardant Management Solutions and TLC Management will be participating in the job fair that will run from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Dec. 14.

Human resources professionals from each company will discuss the qualifications needed, pay and benefits, and how to apply for current job openings. They are actively hiring administrators, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, personal care attendants, certified nursing assistants, dietary managers and more.

“Long-term care is a critical industry for the state of Indiana, and fully staffing these facilities is of utmost importance to the state’s well-being,” said DWD Commissioner Fred Payne. “We are pleased to partner with the Indiana Health Care Association and four of its member providers to announce these important opportunities to potential jobseekers.”

Every day, more than 2 million Americans are cared for in long-term care facilities nationwide. More Americans are expected to need long-term care services over the next couple of decades as the Baby Boomer generation ages.

Accordingly, the number of high-demand, high-wage job opportunities in the health care sector are expected to follow this growth in Indiana, with thousands of health care jobs currently posted across the state. Wages in the long-term care sector have grown approximately 20 percent in recent years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“The long-term care industry offers rewarding careers with tremendous growth potential for dedicated health care workers who want to make a difference in the lives of Hoosier seniors. Our providers have numerous vacant positions that they are looking to fill across the state, offering great starting wages and competitive benefit packages,” said IHCA/INCAL President Zach Cattell. “I value our partnership with the state and appreciate Commissioner Payne and DWD for hosting this virtual job fair with us on Dec. 14, so we can hire more Hoosiers in the industry.”

Individuals who are interested in the virtual job fair but unable to attend should still register, as all registrants will receive a link to the recording.

To register, visit: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8907215583945992975.

After registering, a confirmation email will be sent containing information about joining the webinar.

Indiana Senate Page Program now accepting applications

The Indiana Senate is now accepting applications for the 2022 Senate Page Program.

Through the full-day program, students in grades six through 12 can tour Indiana’s Statehouse, listen to debates and help staff with age-appropriate tasks. Students also have the opportunity to meet with their state senator.

The Senate Page Program begins in January and runs through early March. Positions fill quickly, so early application is encouraged.

Pages are scheduled to be at the Statehouse from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Groups serve together on Wednesdays.

For more information or to apply, go to www.IndianaSenateRepublicans.com/page-program.

Johnson Co. correctional officer charged with having sex with inmate

Johnson County Sheriff Duane Burgess says he received information Thursday morning that a correctional officer with the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office was possibly engaged in a relationship with a female inmate.

 

The administrative staff met to discuss the allegations. A criminal and internal investigation was opened and members of the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office Investigations Division spoke with the female inmate and her attorney.

 

After investigators obtained a statement from the inmate, Sheriff Duane Burgess spoke with the sheriff of Morgan County and requested two of his detectives to handle any potential criminal investigation and speak with the correctional officer.  Detectives from the Morgan County Sheriff’s Office were briefed on the allegations and they began their investigation.

 

By 5:30 pm Thursday, Correctional Officer Zachariah B. Johnson, 28, of North Vernon, was interviewed at the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office. At the conclusion of the interview, and after consultation with Johnson Prosecutor Joseph Villanueva,  Johnson was arrested and booked into the Johnson County Jail on three counts of sexual misconduct, three counts of official misconduct and trafficking with an inmate.

 

Johnson’s employment with the Sheriff’s Office has been terminated.

 

Morgan County Sheriff’s investigators will be presenting an affidavit to the Johnson County Prosecutor’s Office for review. When the allegations have been reviewed, Prosecutor Villanueva will make a decision on any formal charges.

 

Sheriff Burgess notes that these allegations involve a Sheriff’s office employee allegedly engaged in criminal acts while working in his official capacity as an employee, the Morgan County Sheriff’s Office was brought into this criminal matter to ensure complete transparency.

 

Sheriff Burgess says this type of action will not be tolerated by his office.

 

 

City releases additional downtown holiday celebration information

For the first time in two years, the City of Shelbyville will stage a downtown holiday celebration in conjunction with the completion of a three-year downtown redevelopment project.

Friday’s holiday celebration starts at 5 p.m. on the Public Square and includes several family-friendly options to entertain until the start of the Christmas Parade at 7 p.m.

The city’s street department will close off traffic access to the Public Square at 5 p.m.

Harrison Street will be closed from Franklin Street to Broadway and Washington Street will be closed from Pike to Tompkins Street.

Traffic flow will be returned to normal at approximately 9 p.m. Friday.

Parking will not be allowed in the city lot on East Washington Street so that an ice rink can be set up.

There also will be parking restrictions in place along Washington, Harrison and Tompkins streets. The downtown parking garage, located behind the Methodist Building, will be open and available for parking.

In conjunction with the holiday celebration, there will be a Mistletoe Market that will feature 28 artisans and vendors at two locations – outdoors on the Public Square and indoors at the renovated Blessing’s Opera House, originally opened in 1869, located on the second floor above Pudder’s restaurant.

The city’s activated alley on East Washington Street will have Bourbon & Brews set up while the downtown area will feature food trucks, carriage rides, a live nativity scene and reindeer.

Cookies and cocoa will be served at the former Chase Bank building on the southwest corner of the Public Square. At the conclusion of the parade, Santa and Mrs. Claus will meet with children inside the former bank now owned by the city.

The parade will start from the Porter Center north of the Public Square and travel to downtown and head west on West Washington Street toward City Hall.

Santa and Mrs. Claus will depart the parade at the Public Square to take part in the downtown holiday lighting ceremony.

The Lonesome Troubadour returns for performance in downtown Shelbyville

Much like his moniker suggests, Mitch Ellis is living life on the road one day at a time.

Dubbed the “Lonesome Troubadour” several years ago, the Kentucky native calls home wherever he is playing music that night.

Ellis will be performing Friday night at Cadillac Jack’s, 29 Public Square in Shelbyville, at 8 p.m. following the city’s downtown holiday celebration.

Ellis’ latest song is about growing up in Kentucky just across the Ohio River from Madison, Indiana. The lyrics are an extension of the lifestyle he currently lives.

“Like 300 horses I’m wild and free, running through the kills of Kentucky. Lord only knows where we’re gonna be, 300 wild horses and me.”

The Lonesome Troubadour, a name bestowed on him during an early venture into the world of professional wrestling, credits his grandfather for his early interest in playing the guitar and Fairland-native Trent Moss for introducing him to the local music scene.

“Music is engrained in my family. My grandfather was probably one of my biggest musical influences,” said Ellis. “He taught a lot of his kids music that wanted to learn. When my time came around, he taught me what he could but mostly he left that up to his kids. They would put a guitar in my hand and say, ‘Sit right here and try to follow us. If you can’t, don’t worry, just watch and see if you can’t put it into action.’

“I would sit there and they would go through a couple of songs and eventually I would get my chord progressions right. Before I knew it, I was following along and they would hear me. They would actually stop just so I would keep playing and that’s how I knew I was hooked for life.”

Ellis spent time kicking around a karaoke bar in Madison when he was discovered – not for his musical inclinations but his sheer size as a human being.

“I was walking into a karaoke bar I had been visiting for awhile and this dude was standing outside smoking a cigarette and talking to an old friend,” explained Ellis. “He sees me coming and looks at me, looks me up and down. I’m thinking people don’t usually do this to me, I hope he’s not trying to start some altercation.

“He goes, ‘You have to let me train you for professional wrestling. I want you in the ring.’”

Ellis credits wrestling as his first foray into show business.

“One of the first jobs I had there was ring announcing and the music man bringing the wrestlers out to the ring,” he said. “Occasionally, during intermissions, I would grab my guitar and step into the ring and play.”

The physical toll of being a professional wrestler proved more than Ellis wanted to invest, but the performer in him was becoming more brazen.

“About four years ago, Trent Moss was at a bar (in Butlerville) I was hanging out in and he caught my attention,” said Ellis. “I watched his show and I applauded him. I think that’s how he knew I played music. When he took his break, he came out into the crowd and started talking to me. During the talk, he figured out I was a musician and he asked me to play his breaks.”

Although hesitant, Ellis recognized an opportunity and performed for nearly an hour. The Lonesome Troubadour now had a new purpose in life.

“I just want to keep going,” said Ellis of his current career goals. “I don’t need to stop unless I absolutely have to and if I absolutely have to that’s when they put me eight feet in the ground. I just want to play and sing for anyone that wants to listen.”

Friday night’s set is not Ellis’ first in Shelbyville. He has performed at Crosstown Bar and Cadillac Jack’s and knows what to expect from the local crowd.

“I really like the crowds,” said Ellis. “They seem to really prefer their live music than free jukebox night. If you listen to my shows, I’m pretty much a jukebox myself for the good old country tunes, usually the ones you grew up listening to or your dad grew up listening to.”

To learn more about Ellis and hear his music, go to www.thelonesometroubadour.com.

SCUFFY announces 2022 campaign goal - $875, 000

Shelby County United Fund Executive Director Alecia Gross and 2022 Drive Chair Ricca Macklin made the following announcement of the goal and theme for the 2022 SCUFFY drive that officially begins in March.

 

 

MHP Covid Incident Command Update - December 1

Major Health Partners issued a Covid Incident Command Update on Wednesday, December 1.  It includes information on an upcoming pedatric Covid vaccination clinic.

 

Pediatric Covid Vaccine Clinic

A Pediatric Covid Vaccination Clinic will be held Saturday, December 11, 8:00 am - 2:00 pm We will administer the newly approved Covid vaccine for ages 5-11, which is one-third of the adult dose.  We will also administer the Covid vaccine for pediatric patients ages 12+. 

 

Please call MHP Pediatrics (317) 398-7337 to schedule your vaccine appointment.

 

Covid testing positivity rate

Indiana’s Covid positivity rate is at 12.2% and Shelby County’s positivity rate is 10.1%.  Both represent a substantial increase compared to the prior reporting period. 

 

Shelby County’s rise in Covid positivity rate places us in the “orange” category.   

 

MHP Priority Care and primary care walk-ins

Walk-in volumes at all locations have experienced an increase beginning the Saturday after Thanksgiving.  Priority Care is averaging 90+ urgent care patients per day.  Priority Care has experienced a rise in Covid positivity. 

 

MHP Family and Internal Medicine is seeing 50+ walk-in patients per day, also with an increase in Covid positivity. 

 

MHP Pediatrics is seeing 80+ walk-in patients per day, which is well above our average. 

 

Emergency Department

The Emergency Department is seeing between 70-75 patients per day over the last four days, which remains above our normal volumes.  There has also been an increase in Covid infusion referrals. 

 

We are averaging over 25 Regeneron infusions per day.  We have 75 remaining doses of Regeneron and we hope to receive additional doses soon. 

 

Inpatient unit

38 of our 40 beds are occupied on our 3rd floor inpatient unit.

  • We currently have seven critical care patients on the 3rd floor and five of those patients are due to Covid.  Of the five Covid-related critical care patientsonly one is vaccinated.   
  • We have five patients on ventilators, plus three additional patients who are on Vapotherm or BiPap.  All vented patients are due to Covid. 
  • Seventeen of our inpatients are Covid positive and twelve of them are unvaccinated.

Columbus man charged in death of his daughter in White River

A Bartholomew County man is charged in the death of his daughter.

 

On Wednesday Jeremy Sweet, 39, of Columbus, was served an arrest warrant on charges of Neglect of a Dependent Resulting in Death (Level 1 Felony) and Unlawful Possession of Syringe (Level 6 Felony).  The charges are a result of what local authorities have called a lengthy and detailed investigation by the Bartholomew County Sheriff’s Office and several other assisting agencies.

 

The body of a two-year old Emma Sweet was found almost two miles downstream from the initial investigation site.   Jeremy Sweet was hospitalized with hypothermia after he and his truck were found partially submerged in the White River.  Sweet told authorities he wasn't certain what caused his truck to go into the river down a 15-foot embankment.

 

Sheriff Myers said Sweet has given differing accounts of what happened.

 

“Again, I want to reiterate that in my 30 years in law enforcement, I have never seen such cooperation in an investigation,” said Sheriff Matt Myers. “I would like to thank our BCSO Detectives who have spent countless hours on this investigation.”

"I would also like to thank the other assisting agencies: BCSO (deputies, detectives, administration), BCSO Reserve Deputies, BCSO Chaplains, CPD Chaplains, CRH EMS, ISP (troopers, divers and aviation), CPD, DNR, CFD, Columbus Township FD, Southwest FD, Wayne Township FD, Elizabethtown FD, Clay Township FD, Danville FD, Amity FD, Cataract FD, Bartholomew County Coroner’s Office, Bartholomew County EOC, Bartholomew County Prosecutor (Deputy Prosecutor Greg Long) and 31 Wrecker."


Sheriff Matt Myers would again ask that the community continue to keep the victim’s family in its thoughts and prayers.
 

Sweet is currently being held on a $1.2 million bond or 10% cash.

 

 

 

I-74 Corridor group presents case to READI and IEDC

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation and members of the READI review committee are hosting 17 self-identified regions that submitted regional development plans to be considered for funding from the Indiana Regional Economic Acceleration and Development Initiative (READI).

 

Each region will have the opportunity to present its vision, goals and strategies to positively impact the area’s quality of place and quality of life, innovation, entrepreneurship, and talent attraction and development. 

 

Shelby County Commissioner Don Parker on Monday’s presentation which included Shelbyville, Shelby County and neighboring partners.

 

 

Parker says the group, one of the first to present, did well.

 

 

To be noted, it’s not just an effort by the regions represented to gain $50 million in READI funds.  The plan presented by the I-74 group encompasses dozens of projects and items of growth which, all together, would add up to approximately $866 million in investment.

 


Each presentation will be recorded and posted to IndianaREADI.com.

 

 

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