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IHSAA maintains forward progress for fall sports

Even if high school football happens in Indiana on schedule, there will be more logistics to work out. Those logistics are of utmost concern to the new commissioner of the IHSAA Paul Neidig.

 

One of Neidig’s concerns is the number of fans that will attend each game. That has to be taken into account for social distancing and other coronavirus guidelines.

 

“There’s a possibility that there may be a waiver that local health departments can issue if it’s over 250 people and we’re going to be working to provide clarity to our schools on attendance numbers,” said Neidig in an interview with Greg Rakestraw (who was filling in for JMV) on 93.5 and 107.5 The Fan. “There are some interpretation things that we’ve got to get from the state, so we can provide some guidance.”

 

Neidig says working with Governor Eric Holcomb, the Department of Education and the Indiana State Health Department won’t be difficult.

 

“It’s one for all and all for one. If we have a question, we know we can reach out and get that answer. If they have a question of us and how we do things, they know they can reach out and get that answer from us,” said Neidig.

 

An idea that Neidig has heard mentioned by many people is pushing football to the spring and baseball to the fall. Neidig is very concerned about that scenario.

 

“If you take baseball and move it to the fall, kids and families that love baseball would lose two seasons in a row. I also worry about the health and safety aspect of football. If we contest the season in the spring and then let’s say we get done with our state championships in June. Then we would turn right around and start another football season 4-6 short weeks later, I’m not sure that’s best for kids and the safety of the sport,” said Neidig.

 

Given the unpredictability of coronavirus, Neidig understands it’s very possible some teams may play more regular-season games than others, but there will not be a minimum regular-season game requirement to play in the postseason.

 

“If a school is doing everything they can and the cards don’t layout or play their way, we’re going to be very flexible in allowing our member schools to play in our tournament. We have a great thing in this state where it’s an all-in tournament. Everybody that plays, gets to play in that tournament. I certainly am not going to affect that by a school or team falling one or two games short of a ‘minimum’ especially in a time like this,” said Neidig.

 

He says the IHSAA is ready for what he calls “starts and stops” along the way during the season.

“As we get into this fall season, we’re going to have some teams that don’t have any issues at all. We’re going to have some teams that are going to get shut down. At that point, we’ll cancel the contest. We’ll declare it a ‘no contest’ and hope everybody gets healthy and back to play as soon as possible,” says Neidig.

 

Neidig has been with the IHSAA since 2017, as an assistant commissioner, overseeing the sports of cross country, track and field, and boys basketball.

IHSAA maintains forward progress for fall sports

Even if high school football happens in Indiana on schedule, there will be more logistics to work out. Those logistics are of utmost concern to the new commissioner of the IHSAA Paul Neidig.

 

One of Neidig’s concerns is the number of fans that will attend each game. That has to be taken into account for social distancing and other coronavirus guidelines.

 

“There’s a possibility that there may be a waiver that local health departments can issue if it’s over 250 people and we’re going to be working to provide clarity to our schools on attendance numbers,” said Neidig in an interview with Greg Rakestraw (who was filling in for JMV) on 93.5 and 107.5 The Fan. “There are some interpretation things that we’ve got to get from the state, so we can provide some guidance.”

 

Neidig says working with Governor Eric Holcomb, the Department of Education and the Indiana State Health Department won’t be difficult.

 

“It’s one for all and all for one. If we have a question, we know we can reach out and get that answer. If they have a question of us and how we do things, they know they can reach out and get that answer from us,” said Neidig.

 

An idea that Neidig has heard mentioned by many people is pushing football to the spring and baseball to the fall. Neidig is very concerned about that scenario.

 

“If you take baseball and move it to the fall, kids and families that love baseball would lose two seasons in a row. I also worry about the health and safety aspect of football. If we contest the season in the spring and then let’s say we get done with our state championships in June. Then we would turn right around and start another football season 4-6 short weeks later, I’m not sure that’s best for kids and the safety of the sport,” said Neidig.

 

Given the unpredictability of coronavirus, Neidig understands it’s very possible some teams may play more regular-season games than others, but there will not be a minimum regular-season game requirement to play in the postseason.

 

“If a school is doing everything they can and the cards don’t layout or play their way, we’re going to be very flexible in allowing our member schools to play in our tournament. We have a great thing in this state where it’s an all-in tournament. Everybody that plays, gets to play in that tournament. I certainly am not going to affect that by a school or team falling one or two games short of a ‘minimum’ especially in a time like this,” said Neidig.

 

He says the IHSAA is ready for what he calls “starts and stops” along the way during the season.

“As we get into this fall season, we’re going to have some teams that don’t have any issues at all. We’re going to have some teams that are going to get shut down. At that point, we’ll cancel the contest. We’ll declare it a ‘no contest’ and hope everybody gets healthy and back to play as soon as possible,” says Neidig.

 

Neidig has been with the IHSAA since 2017, as an assistant commissioner, overseeing the sports of cross country, track and field, and boys basketball.

Carrizalez juggling school, sports and horses at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Most high school students are hitting the snooze button at 7:30 a.m. The time for Eddie “Junior” Carrizalez has a different meaning. The 17-year-old senior at Shelbyville High School is transitioning from work to school at that time, a schedule he has maintained for the past few years at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino.

 

Carrizalez is part of a family immersed in horse racing. His father, Miguel Ramos, is an exercise rider and works on the starting gate during the races and his mother, Sara Donjuan, is a groom for Mike Lauer. Carrizalez works alongside his mother as a groom in the Lauer Stable and currently takes care of six horses. Those under his care include Chipofftheoldblock, Comes N Threes, Sunsign, Jingle, Alternate Nights and Ginormous.

 

“I started going to the barn when I was four, so I’ve been around horses all my life,” said Carrizalez. “I like being around them, and my mom has taught me a lot. I take care of them in the morning, get them ready to go to the track and also get them ready on race days and walk them up to the paddock. It’s worked out for me to be at the barn and still get to school and practices.”

 

Carrizalez is referring to a jam-packed schedule each fall. The three-sport athlete is a member of the varsity soccer team as well as the kicker and punter for the football team at Shelbyville High School. He also runs track in the spring. Participating in both fall sports at the same time can have its challenges, but he has worked out a schedule with the coaches and with Lauer.

 

“Right after school, I go to football practice first and then head over to soccer practice,” said Carrizalez. “The day before a game, I usually stay longer at that practice and will miss the other sport on game days. But otherwise, they are at different times and the games are on different days, so it works out.”

 

Soccer has always been a passion for Carrizalez, a love he shares with his father. He learned the game at an early age and competes in leagues outside of school. He even plays at Indiana Grand’s soccer field on dark days of racing with his father and friends.

 

“I mostly learned soccer on my own,” added Carrizalez. “It’s something that I’ve always liked. My dad is a pretty good soccer player. He and my mom come to a lot of my games when they can.”

 

 

Carrizalez was a major contributor on the team during his junior year. As left wing and midfielder, he is quick and can move the ball to teammates in a flash. Carrizalez scored four goals during the year on a team that has produced college talent over the past few seasons. The team took a devastating blow this past spring when senior Nolan Parker was killed in an automobile accident. His passing has had a major impact on the soccer program at Shelbyville.

 

“Soccer just won’t be the same without Nolan,” said Carrizalez. “Even though he was a senior and was graduating, knowing he’s not there is hard. He was a good leader and a great friend.”

 

Following the loss of Parker, disruptions in school and sports due to COVID set in. Carrizalez had to find other ways to get on the field. Although he still had work at the barn in the mornings, he spent most of his evenings playing soccer.

 

“Junior is a special kid who knows how to balance hard work with having fun,” noted Shelbyville Head Soccer Coach Ben Purvis. “He always has a smile on his face when talking and kicking a ball around with his friends, but as soon as we get into exercises, he becomes focused on getting better. He was a raw talent early in his time with our program and has put in the work to become a regular contributor for our varsity. This spring, even though we weren’t allowed to practice due to COVID, I would drive by the fields and more often than not, see Junior working on different aspects of his game. He has a passion for soccer and drive to improve. I’m really excited to see what his senior year holds.”

 

Football is a newer sport for Carrizalez. He has also developed a passion for it and is showing real promise as the team’s punter and kicker. He caught the eye of Head Coach Mike Clevenger two years ago while kicking soccer balls in the gym and has made the conversion over to the gridiron.

 

“I had Eddie (Carrizalez) in my advanced PE class my first full year at Shelbyville,” explained Clevenger. “One day I come into the gym, and I see him kicking a soccer ball the length of the fieldhouse. I asked him if he would be interested in coming out and kicking for the football team. The next season Eddie came out looking like a kid that has kicked (a football) his whole life. He impressed all of us coaches. He has continued to work every day on his kicking, along with going to soccer practice, working, and school. He has become a great asset for us for football. Through his hard work and perseverance, around half of his kickoffs were touchbacks. We all look forward to Eddie's senior year and what he is able to accomplish." 

 

Carrizalez notes that kicking footballs is different than kicking soccer balls. He uses the front of his foot while kicking in football but in soccer, the side of his foot is utilized to move the ball down the field.

 

“Mr. (Luke) Stout (assistant football coach) really helped polish my kicking (for football),” said Carrizalez. “It wasn’t hard to pick up after the first few times. Punting is harder for me, but I’m learning more all the time.”

 

Carrizalez has not had the opportunity to kick a field goal yet in a game, but he has sailed the ball down the field 65 yards during kickoffs and can consistently kick 40-yard field goals in practice. He’s just waiting for the opportunity to put his skills to use in a game.

 

When school resumes Aug. 5 at Shelbyville High School, Carrizalez will cut back to three horses in the Lauer barn. He will still have time to finish up at the barn by 7:30 a.m. and head to school. Afternoons will be totally focused on football and soccer. As a senior, he’s hopeful to get an offer to continue his love of either sport in the college ranks.

 

 

“Right now, it could be anywhere and I’d be interested just to be able to play in college,” said Carrizalez. “I am hoping for soccer, but football would be great too. I haven’t really thought too much about it. But I’d love to play in college.”

 

Whatever the case may be for Carrizalez’s future, he has placed new meaning in the word dedication. With a proven track record, the sky’s the limit for Carrizalez 

 

Roncalli to change "Rebels" nickname

Because of “negative connotations” surrounding it, Roncalli High School says they are changing their nickname.

 

For decades the school’s nickname has been “Rebels,” which the school said was in homage to its namesake, Pope John XXIII, who it felt was a rebel for calling for the Second Vatican Council.

 

The “Rebels” nickname came to reflect a tie to the Confederacy over time and the school leaders now feel it is appropriate to choose a new nickname.

 

Interim President Father Robert Robeson said he would be appointing a special task force to explore alternative names and symbols to better reflect the school’s mission. That task force will include students, parents, faculty, and alumni.

 

“We know that there may be some members of our community who will be saddened by this change. But as we look forward to the next 50 years, we believe that this change is essential in order to better serve our mission as a Catholic high school,” said Robeson.

 

A full video of the announcement from the school to change the nickname can be viewed here:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x2OthC2e50M&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0RTRTKhcFD7YjkPGN-Nq2mwPSq_lWd1SG5jzWoikneB43szOLl_hS6EcI

Stone Lake remains undefeated with Gordon Mobley Futurity win at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

It really wasn’t a matter of if, it was a matter of which one in the 11th running of the $186,000 Gordon Mobley Futurity Final at Indiana Grand Tuesday, July 21. With four in the final, Trainer Tony Cunningham had the top three favorites in the field of 10, finishing one-two with Stone Lake and Beach Diva, respectively. Time for the 300-yard dash was :15.623.

 

Starting from the outside post 10, Stone Lake wasn’t quick out of the gate, but stablemate Beach Diva was for jockey Giovani Vazquez-Gomez. The pint-sized daughter of Escondido Beach surged out of the gate on top and was the one to catch the entire way. Beach Diva had basically put the field away, with the exception of Stone Lake, who was gaining ground and momentum with every stride. L. D. “Daniel” Martinez timed the finish perfectly, grabbing the win by a head right at the wire over Beach Diva. Mitey Persuasive and Cesar Esqueda finished third, just a nose ahead of another Cunningham trained finalist ZZ Stones Ablazing with Sergio Ramirez aboard.

 

“He (Stone Lake) broke a little slow but he started running faster and faster,” said Martinez, who was confident the photo finish would be in his favor. “Every step he took he was just going faster and faster. It’s very fun to ride a horse like this.”

 

Bred by Sheri Miller, owner of Escondido Beach, Stone Lake is now three for three for his connections, who purchased him out of the QHRAI Speed Sale last fall for $15,000. His earnings now topple over the $119,000 mark.

 

“Anytime you are in a field of horses like this and get on the front end like that, it’s a great feeling,” said Cunningham. “Everyone was here to run today. These owners (Brad and Patti Marshall) are great people and so good to work for. I’m really glad he’s doing so well for them.”

 

Cunningham was equally as impressed with runner up Beach Diva, who is owned by Miller.

 

“I thought she (Beach Diva) could win the whole thing today coming into the race,” said Cunningham. “She’s a gutty little horse. Anytime you can run one-two in a race like this, you are very blessed.”

 

Cunningham did note they will take a short break with Stone Lake and skip the next stakes race at Indiana Grand. The chestnut son of Escondido Beach will skip the QHRAI Stallion Service Auction Futurity with the trials on the next all-Quarter Horse day Saturday, Aug. 8. He will return to action for the Leader of the Class in mid-September.

 

Live racing continues through Wednesday, Nov. 18 with action held Monday through Thursday beginning at 2:20 p.m. Three more Saturday programs are slated for all-Quarter Horse days Aug. 8, Oct. 23 and Oct. 24. The Aug. 8 program will begin at 10 a.m.

Indy 500 reducing to 25% capacity for next month's race

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway has made more changes for next month’s Indianapolis 500.

 

IMS announced Tuesday afternoon that they are reducing the maximum attendance from 50 percent capacity to 25 percent. In addition, face coverings will be required for all in attendance.

 

IMS says it has prepared a detailed, nearly 100-page plan that provides guidelines and protocols for how the race will be run, including the reassignment of seats for social distancing purposes, the requirement of masks, temperature checks, and distribution of hand sanitizer.

 

The track will stop selling tickets for the August 23 race this Friday, which will further limit the number of people who can attend.

 

Penske Entertainment Corp. President & CEO Mark Miles said in June that attendance would be limited to no more than 50 percent of capacity.  They are offering credits to fans who had previously purchased tickets, encouraging those over 65 to stay at home, limiting attendance in the infield,

reducing tickets in the suites and promising fans their decision to not attend would not impact their seniority or right to renew tickets for 2021.

 

A conference call to go over the details is scheduled for Wednesday.

IHSAA to allow virtual students to play sports

 It looks like high school student-athletes that are taking online courses to start the fall semester will still be able to participate in sports.

 

The Indiana High School Athletic Association sent a letter to all athletic directors in Indiana, informing them of a change to a by-law. It says if a school is offering virtual or online courses this fall semester, and it’s taught by a member school personnel, they can still participate in sports.

 

However, “local control decision making permit a school to set a requirement above the standard set forth by the IHSAA. For instance, a school may still require in-building attendance for athletic participation.”

 

The letter also noted that “if a third party is delivering instruction to your students (teachers not employed by your school), and the percentage of courses being taught is over 30% of total number of courses offered, a waiver –for the school, not the athlete — is required from the IHSAA.”

Blue River Soccer Assoc registration winding up this week

Blue River Soccer Association’s last day to register for this season is Friday, July 17. 

 

Registration fee is $70 per player.  More details are available on website or Facebook page. 

 

Registration is required online at www.blueriversoccer.org

 

Blue River Soccer Association’s Open House is Sunday, July 26, 2-6pm at the Blue River Memorial Park- Soccer Fields.  The first day of games is August 15. 

 

The deck cards are available and will be available at the open house and now from board members. 

 

For more details, e-mail brsapresident@gmail.com .

 

 

First time winners in NASCAR and IndyCar

Sunday was an exciting day in the racing world, as IndyCar and NASCAR both saw first-time winners.

 

Cole Custer went four-wide on the final lap to score his first career NASCAR win at Kentucky Speedway.

 

In the IndyCar race at Road America, Felix Rosenqvist passed Pato O'Ward with two laps to go to get his first career IndyCar win.

Tyler Erb, Mike McKinney victorious in Summer Nationals opener at Brownstown

Just over three years ago, Tyler Erb scored his first career DIRTcar Summer Nationals victory in the Hoosier State. In Wednesday night’s season opener at Indiana’s Brownstown Speedway, Terbo did it again.

 

Erb wheeled his Best Performance Rocket Chassis #1 around the low side of Turns 1-2 with just four laps remaining after chasing then-leader Bobby Pierce around for most of the 40-lap Feature. With Pierce on the ragged edge up top, Erb found the bite down low and slid in front of Pierce as they raced out of Turn 2.

 

Pierce tried to cross back underneath Erb heading into Turn 3 but was unsuccessful. Erb had the low-side momentum rolling, stayed with it out of Turn 4 and held off Pierce through the final three circuits to claim his second career Hell Tour victory.

 

“Bobby was really committed up there. We had on a little different tire than everyone else here,” Erb said of his pass for the lead.

 

Pierce was out to a commanding lead in the opening stages but saw it erased when defending Summer Nationals champion Brian Shirley slowed to bring out the caution on lap 23. Shirley was pushed back to the pits with apparent mechanical issues.

 

On the ensuing restart, third-running Kyle Bronson got a terrific jump and snuck by Erb to take second. But as the field restarted for the final time on Lap 31, Erb returned the favor and stole it back with a terrific move to Bronson’s inside heading into Turn 3.

 

“I hated to see that caution at about Lap 20, Kyle got by me. It’s just a product of getting passed. I had to try something… I got a good restart off the bottom, started entering really low and trying to park it in the middle. It was a really good track,” Erb said.

 

Pierce held up through the final three laps to finish second after Erb got by for the lead in the closing stages. The 2019 Summer Nationals winner at Brownstown, Mike Marlar, drove a terrific race inside the top-five throughout to claim the final podium spot, while Allen Weisser and Bronson rounded out the top-five.

 

The DIRTcar Summer Nationals Late Model action continues Thursday night, July 9, at Peoria Speedway in Peoria, IL. Don’t miss a moment of the action – tune into DIRTVision presented by Drydene to watch every lap LIVE.

 

Feature (40 Laps) 1. 1T-Tyler Erb [1]; 2. 32-Bobby Pierce [2]; 3. 57-Mike Marlar [6]; 4. 25W-Allen Weisser [9]; 5. 40B-Kyle Bronson [4]; 6. 99JR-Frank Heckenast, [8]; 7. 28-Tyler Carpenter [3]; 8. 17J-Greg Johnson [14]; 9. 16-Jason Jameson [11]; 10. 25-Jason Feger [18]; 11. 76-Shelby Miles [7]; 12. 14B-Britan Godsey [13]; 13. 22-Austin Burns [10]; 14. 4G-Bob Gardner [15]; 15. 48-Tim Lance [19]; 16. 32S-Chad Stapleton [22]; 17. 3S-Brian Shirley [5]; 18. 19R-Ryan Gustin [17]; 19. 1G-Devin Gilpin [12]; 20. 13-Brayton Laster [16]; 21. 24-Jared Bailey [20]; 22. 48L-Tim Lance, [21]

 

DIRTcar Summit Racing Equipment Modifieds

In chasing a championship, it’s crucial to win early and often. That’s exactly what Mike McKinney started in Wednesday night’s DIRTcar Summit Racing Equipment Modified Nationals opener at Brownstown Speedway with a Feature win in convincing fashion over Nick Hoffman and Ryan Thomas.

 

Starting on the pole in the 25-lap Feature, McKinney gave up the lead to Will Krup right away and quickly fell back to third behind two-time and defending Summit Modifieds champion Nick Hoffman.

 

But a quick yellow after just four laps re-stacked the field and allowed McKinney the opportunity he needed to get the lead back, which he did immediately, digging under Krup on the low side on the restart and taking the lead back for good one lap later.

 

From there on out, it was all The Magic Man. He led the field around Brownstown virtually unchallenged for the remaining 20 laps to collect his 10th career Summit Modifieds victory.

 

“They drove by me on the [original] start, but then on that restart, I don’t know, it was just the light switch, I guess,” McKinney said. “Whoever was in second gave me a shot and [the track] might’ve took some rubber there, so I moved up and was able to hold them off.”

 

His competition was tough, but McKinney’s #96 Elite Chassis held strong and even showed his haters a thing or two before the race was out.

 

“Starting with Nick and Will, I knew it was going to be tough. They’re the best-of-the-best when it gets slick like this. Everyone always gives me crap and says I can only run the cushion at Fairbury, so I hope I proved everybody wrong,” McKinney said.

 

Hoffman held strong inside the podium throughout the race to claim the runner-up spot, while Ryan Thomas was able to slide his #T9 by Krup with 10 laps remaining to collect third. Jacoby Hines rounded out the top-five.

 

The DIRTcar Summit Racing Equipment Modified Nationals action continues Thursday night, July 9, at Peoria Speedway in Peoria, IL. Don’t miss a moment of the action – tune into DIRTVision presented by Drydene to watch every lap LIVE.

 

Feature (25 Laps) 1. 96M-Mike McKinney [1][$10,000]; 2. 7-Nick Hoffman [3][$5,000]; 3. T9-Ryan Thomas [4][$3,000]; 4. K19-Will Krup [2][$2,500]; 5. 115-Jacoby Hines [6][$2,000]; 6. 25W-Allen Weisser [16][$1,700]; 7. 34J-Jordan Wever [8][$1,400]; 8. 99-Hunt Gossum [11][$1,300]; 9. 66-Cole Falloway [7][$1,200]; 10. 9H-John DeMoss [18][$1,100]; 11. 93W-Brayden Watson [13][$1,050]; 12. 7D-Brad DeYoung [20][$1,000]; 13. 23-Ryan Cripe [9][$950]; 14. 7L-Mark Lamont [14][$900]; 15. 16C-John Clippinger [10][$850]; 16. 11J-Jarod Fleetwood [15][$800]; 17. 36-Kenny Wallace [12][$770]; 18. 35-David Stremme [5][$750]; 19. 46-Derek Groomer [17][$730]; 20. 21A-Nick Allen [21][$700]; 21. 24-Zeke McKenzie [19][$700] Hard Charger: 25W-Allen Weisser[+10]

Shedaresthedevil went down to Indiana for a win in Grade 3 Indiana Oaks at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Heavily-favored Shedaresthedevil added to her Kentucky Oaks resume with a dominant five-length victory over 14-1 Impeccable Style in Wednesday’s $200,000 Indiana Oaks at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino.

 

The Grade 3 victory was worth 20 points toward Kentucky Oaks qualifying and put Shedaresthedevil into third on the Oaks leader board with 90 points, trailing only her stablemate Bonny South (100) and Swiss Skydiver (a whopping 310).

 

“Super proud of her,” said Staton Flurry, co-owner of Shedaresthedevil. “She’s nice. I’d say we’re definitely in the conversation for the (Kentucky) Oaks right now. We’re for sure going to run, but I think we’re very well toward the top of being one of the top contenders. Hopefully she runs like she did today come the first Friday in September. It’s weird saying that. Let’s hope this year is the only time we have to say it.”

 

Shedaresthedevil certainly ran to her odds as the 3-5 favorite in the field of eight 3-year-old fillies to kick off a huge parlay for trainer Brad Cox and jockey Florent Geroux, who teamed in the next race to win the $300,000, Grade 3 Indiana Derby with Shared Sense. Cox, one of the leading trainers at Indiana Grand, won both stakes for the first time.

 

“We expected her to run well,” he said. “She’d been training the part since her last race at Churchill, where she ran a big race. It was a good trip, she responded well. I thought she looked great at the quarter pole. Florent had to kind of reach around and keep her alert the last sixteenth of a mile. He said she kind of got a little lost late. But when he asked her the last sixteenth, she really kicked on. Overall it was a big effort, exactly what we were looking for. I was real pleased with her.”

 

Geroux had Shedaresthedevil settled into second behind the speedy Miss T Too, taking command on the middle of the far turn and romping through the stretch to wrap up 1 1/16 miles in 1:43.50. She paid $3.20 to win. 

 

“It ran kind of the way we thought it was going to run,” Geroux said. “With Julien (Leparoux on Miss T Too) going to the front, I was able to sit second, and she was very relaxed and was able to keep up with the pace no problem. She was waiting a little bit down the stretch. Last time at Churchill she was a little more focused, because she’s there every day and here she didn’t know (surroundings) too much. She was waiting a little bit on horses and waiting for my signal to keep going. I gave her few taps at the eighth pole just to keep her focused, and it was just a matter of how many lengths by which she was going to win.”

 

Impeccable Style, with Indiana Grand’s leading rider Deshawn Parker aboard, put the most pressure on Shedaresthedevil and settled for second-best.

 

“It was a good race,” said Kenny McPeek, trainer of Impeccable Style as well as Swiss Skydiver. “The obvious favorite won it. But yeah, I was pleased. She’s a good filly… She is in the Fasig-Tipton sale Monday (in Lexington). So, I’m not sure exactly how that will go. They’ll probably put a high reserve on her.”

 

Bayerness, ridden by Rafael Bejarano, finished another 1 3/4 lengths back in third. 

 

“It’s her second time getting graded stakes-placed,” said trainer Cherie DeVaux. “She was third in the Dogwood. Both times she was the only one who came running at the end. She puts in her race every time.”

 

Fire Coral finished fourth, followed by Miss T Too, Gibberish, Spartanka and Alandra. Aurelia Garland, Lucky Betty and Tempers Rising were scratched.

 

Shedaresthedevil won her debut at Churchill Downs last year with trainer Norm Casse. She went out to California, where she was trained by Simon Callaghan and finished fourth in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies Turf. Put in the Keeneland’s November breeding stock sale, the filly was purchased for $280,000 by the partnership of Qatar Racing, Flurry Racing and Big Aut Farms and turned over to Cox.

 

This year Shedaresthedevil won Oaklawn Park’s Grade 3 Honeybee, was third in the Grade 3 Fantasy won by Swiss Skydiver and then took a Churchill Downs allowance race by six lengths. She now is 4-2-2 in nine starts, earning $501,768 with the $116,400 payday.

 

“Very, very proud of her,” Cox said. “I think she’s only going to get better with more distance and maybe even when she gets older.”

 

Live racing continues through Wednesday, Nov. 18. Action is held Monday through Thursday beginning at 2:20 p.m. Post times for the all-Quarter Horse programs is to be determined.

She'sonthewarpath on a mission in Indiana General Assembly Stakes at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Jockey Chantal Sutherland had a troubled trip en route to victory with favored She’sonthewarpath in Wednesday’s $75,000 Indiana General Assembly Distaff at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino.

 

Oh, the Steve Margolis-trained She’sonthewarpath had little problems, content to settle just behind the two tepid pacesetters before moving to the outside on the far turn and going on methodically to hold off No Mo Lady by three-quarters of a length. The anxious moments for Sutherland came in getting to Indiana Grand.

 

The jockey rode the fifth race at Keeneland, which went off at 3:23 p.m., only to find out that the private charter she’d hired to whisk her to Shelbyville was canceled because of lightning. Sutherland rushed to her car, not even bothering to change out of her riding pants and sped the 170 miles between Lexington and Indiana Grand — arriving in time to make Indiana Grand’s eighth race, which went off at 6:19.

 

“Man, I would never drive that fast again,” Sutherland said. “I’m still dirty from the other race. I just had to change my pants because the horse (at Keeneland) threw me out the back of the gate, so I was covered in mud. I’m still covered in mud, but not from this race.

 

“She’s amazing,” the jockey said of She’sonthewarpath. “She kind of rests herself to make sure she’s maintaining herself to make sure she’s not doing too much down the backside. Then I could feel pressure on my outside and it was time to make a move to get clear. She’s so responsive. I tapped her on the shoulder and she’s just pushbutton.”

 

She’sonthewarpath covered 1 1/16 miles over firm turf in 1:42.02 and paid $3.60 to win as the 4-5 favorite. The 4-year-old daughter of Declaration of War really came into her own over the winter in New Orleans, winning a pair of $100,000 stakes. Moving into graded-stakes company at Churchill Downs, she rallied to finish fourth in Churchill Downs’ Grade 3 Mint Julep in her previous start, losing by a combined half-length.

 

“Steve is just a magician to getting her to peak when she needs to peak, and to relax,” Sutherland said. “He’s timed her races so well. He’s so supportive of me. It’s been a really tough go with this COVID and keeping your business. It’s really slowed down. But I feel I’m riding amazing. I’m proud of myself for just sticking it out. But it’s tough. I’m just grateful to Steve for not giving up and replacing me with some flavor of the month jockey right now. It’s awesome to have that support. And I’m so grateful to the owners.”

 

She’sonthewarpath is now 6-1-2 in 13 starts, earning $337,355 for owner-breeders Lawana and Robert Low.

 

“She’s just a trier, just a hard-trying filly that gives her all,” the Churchill Downs-based Margolis said. “She just likes to run.”

 

No Mo Lady and jockey Julian Pimentel finished a half-length in front of Complicit, followed by Amazima, Seransita, Hanalei Moon and the pacesetting Rogue Too. Makealitlemischief was scratched after being fractious in the gate, leaving a field of seven older fillies and mares.

 

Live racing continues through Wednesday, Nov. 18. Action is held Monday through Thursday beginning at 2:20 p.m. Post times for the all-Quarter Horse programs is to be determined.

Racing relocations from Lone Star Park suspended at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Due to the recent news of several positive tests for Covid-19 at Lone Star Park near Dallas, Texas and the suspension of their racing season indefinitely, Indiana Grand Racing and Casino has halted the transfer of all jockeys, exercise riders and grooms from that facility to the racing program in Indiana.

 

Effective immediately Monday, July 6, 2020, Indiana Grand will follow CDC guidelines and will not allow anyone from the above racing category currently working and racing at Lone Star onto the property due to potential exposure risks. All individuals wishing to relocate to Indiana racing will be required to quarantine for 14 days. At the conclusion of the quarantine period, participants will be required to provide a negative Covid-19 test before they will be allowed on the grounds at Indiana Grand.

 

The decision to prevent participants coming from Lone Star Park into Indiana is a result of a group effort between Indiana Grand, the horsemen’s organizations and Indiana Horse Racing Commission, to provide due diligence for the safety of all those currently racing at Indiana Grand.

 

Live racing continues through Nov. 18. Action is held Monday through Thursday with a first post of 2:20 p.m.

IMS doubleheader

It's a first of it's kind. A double-header event with IndyCar and NASCAR sharing a venue in one weekend for the first time ever.  Couple that with the first-ever race on the road course at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway that will feature stock cars. The NASCAR Xfinity Series will run the Penzoil 150 on the road course on Saturday.

 

Xfinity Series regular Justin Allgaier, who has won on the IMS oval in the series, said it's big deal.

"To win the first one, of any event, is always a big deal. It's super important," Allgaier said. "I think a lot of the teams and a lot of the drivers put a lot of pressure on themselves to be able to do that."

"Indianapolis is Indianapolis," he added. "It just has a different atmosphere around it. The track has so much history and so much standing in world racing history. To go there and win the inaugural race would be super special."

 

Today, Xfinity car will turn laps in two practice sessions. Normally, NASCAR would not allow drivers and teams to practice because of the coronavirus pandemic. But, since this is the first time stock cars will run on the road course at IMS, NASCAR officials felt it warranted some practice time.

"If we're allowed to watch, I can't wait," said IndyCar driver Conor Daly. "I think it's going to be great. Those guys, I've been getting a lot of texts from different Xfinity guys about the track. I know it will be totally new for them. But I'm excited."

 

The weekend will be the second race of the season for the NTT IndyCar Series with he GMR Grand Prix, rescheduled from the month of May. It will be the first road course test in competition for the newly implemented aeroscreen. The series ran its first race with the aero screen at Texas almost a month ago.

 

"Texas was an eye-opener for a lot of us, I think," said Team Penske driver Simon Pagenaud. "We realized after the race there was a lot of improvement to be made, but not enough time to really think about what we could do on-site. Obviously, it's the same for the road course in Indy. We don't really know yet what's going to need change."

 

The GMR Grand Prix will be the first race to go on Saturday with the green flag dropping at Noon EDT. The Xfinity Series Penzoil 150 will follow at 3:00 p.m. EDT.

 

The Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series will have the stage to itself on Sunday with the Big Machine Handsanitizer 400, more commonly known as the Brickyard 400.

 

"It is a great situation for all three series’ to be together and a huge step for racing," said Cup series driver and two-time Brickyard winner Kevin Harvick. "As you look at IndyCar and Xfinity and Cup cars all at the same venue because we are all racers. We all want to see racing be successful and I think this is definitely a great step for both series."

 

Harvick will start 11th on Sunday after NASCAR's blind draw to set the field since there will be no practice or qualifying.

 

Joey Logano of Team Penske will start on pole at his team owner Roger Penske's home track. Kurt Busch will join him in second on the front row followed by Alex Bowman, Jimmie Johnson, Aric Almirola, Denny Hamlin, Kyle Busch, Martin Truex, Jr., Brad Keselowski, and Chase Elliot in the subsequent rows.

 

Green flag for the Brickyard 400 drops at 4:00 p.m. EDT on Sunday.

Registration for reserved hunt starts July 6

Beginning July 6, hunters can apply for a reserved hunts online by visiting on.IN.gov/reservedhunt.

The online method is the only way to apply. No late entries will be accepted. Applicants must possess a hunting license that is valid for the hunt for which they are applying.

Hunters will be selected through a random computerized drawing. Applicants will be able to view drawing results online within two weeks after application deadlines. An email will be sent to all applicants when the drawing is completed.

Applications for the following hunting opportunities open July 6 and must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. on Aug. 17:

  • Dove Hunt Draw: Applicants may select the desired date and property. Due to inclement spring weather, other crops may have been planted in place of or along with sunflowers. Participating properties include Atterbury, Goose Pond, Jasper-Pulaski, Kankakee, Kingsbury, Pigeon River, Glendale, J.E. Roush Lake, Willow Slough and Winamac fish & wildlife areas (FWAs).
     
  • Waterfowl Hunt Draw: Participating FWAs include Goose Pond, Hovey Lake, Kankakee, Kingsbury, LaSalle and Willow Slough. Province Pond Wetland Conservation Area and Monroe Lake will also be participating.
     
  • Deer Hunt Draw: Participating properties include Deer Creek Fish & Wildlife Area, Fairbanks Landing Fish & Wildlife Area, Tern Bar Slough Wildlife Diversity Conservation Area and Shrader-Weaver Nature Preserve in Fayette County.
     
  • Military/Refuge Firearm, Primitive and Archery Deer Hunt Draw: Properties participating include Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge and Mascatatuck National Wildlife Refuge. Please note that hunts on military/refuge properties may be canceled at any time.
     
  • Youth Firearm Deer Hunt: Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge will host one reserved youth firearm deer hunt.
     
  • Pheasant Hunt Draws: The Nov. 7 hunt is reserved for youth (ages 17 and younger) only.

Please note that only one application per hunt is allowed. No changes can be made once the application is submitted.

The application process is now consolidated into the online services website along with licenses, CheckIN Game, and HIP registration. An online account is not required to apply, but a Customer ID number is needed.

In this new system, hunts without a registration fee will follow the same process as those with a fee. For hunts with no fee required in order to register, applicants will be asked to “Add to Cart,” “Proceed to Checkout,” and “Place Order.” If the transaction total is $0, the applicant will not be asked to enter credit card information. Applicants must place an order to submit their application.

To view draw hunt results, applicants can log into their online services account or click “View hunt draw results” at the same site they used to apply for the hunt. From that site, they should select “Click here” under Reserved Hunts to see the status of registered hunts. The link will only show upcoming hunts that an individual has registered for. Logging into an account online is required to see the full history of past hunt registrations, including previous years.


More information is available at on.IN.gov/reservedhunt.