Sports

Damon Bailey's father killed, mother severely injured in accident

The father for former Bedford North Lawrence and Indiana University basketball star Damon Bailey was killed in a Monday accident in Brown County.  His mother was severely injured.

 

Information released by the Brown County Sheriff's Office isn't clear about how the Bailey's motorcycle was involved in the multi-vehicle crash:

 

On Monday, September 21, at approximately 2:47 p.m., deputies with the Brown County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the 3600 block of State Road 46 East in Nashville, Indiana, in reference to a motor vehicle accident involving multiple vehicles.

 

During the investigation, it was found that a 2005 Nissan Altima driven by Jacob Waltermire, was attempting to pass a tractor-trailer and noticed an oncoming motorcycle. Waltermire terminated the pass and got back behind the tractor-trailer before over-correcting and losing control. Waltermire’s vehicle crossed the center line and was struck by a 2012 Hyundai Elantra driven by Hana Cai. Cai was traveling behind the motorcycle and was unable to avoid the collision Waltermire.

 

It is unclear at this time how a 1990 Honda GL1500SE motorcycle, being driven by Wendell Bailey, was involved in the accident. Despite lifesaving efforts, W. Bailey, was pronounced deceased at the scene. W. Bailey’s passenger, Beverly Bailey, was flown to a nearby hospital via helicopter due to the extent of her injuries.

 

No other injuries were reported.

 

Waltermire was taken to Columbus Regional Health for a blood-draw; which is standard procedure in fatality crashes.

 

The accident is still under investigation.

Expect Indy wins third straight title in Richmond Stakes at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Expect Indy was expected to be a major contender in the 20th running of the Richmond Stakes Wednesday, Sept. 16 at Indiana Grand and she didn’t disappoint. The older Indiana sired mare turned it on in the stretch to win her third straight title. As a result, Expect Indy moved into second on the list of all-time leading Indiana bred or sired females in the state’s history with a bankroll that exceeds $541,000.

 

Hailing from the Cipriano Contreras barn, Expect Indy started from the outside post six in the lineup and moved with intention early out of the gate for jockey Emmanuel Esquivel. The seven-year-old mare couldn’t quite get to the lead on her own but was content to follow along on the outside of Unbridled Class and Marcelino Pedroza, who set the early tempo.

 

“We knew we didn’t want to be too far off (the pace) so we could make it a race in the end,” added Contreras. “It’s just kind of the way the race played out today.”

 

Around the final turn, the field began to pitch their best moves to overtake the top two, but both Expect Indy and Unbridled Class were not backing down. In the stretch, it became a two-horse match race as the duo matched each other stride for stride until the final steps, placing Expect Indy on the winning end by two and three-quarter lengths over Unbridled Class. Pretty Assets, who was last most of the way, came charging late in her usual running style for third with DeShawn Parker aboard. The time of the one and one-sixteenth mile race was 1:46.24.

 

“She broke well and after that, she was forwardly placed,” said Esquivel. “The rest, she pretty much did on her own. She’s a lot different horse to ride going long. When she’s going short you have to chase her some because she gets so comfortable.”

 

Expect Indy paid $7.40, $3.00 and $2.20 across the board. It was her 12th career win for Andrew Berg’s Gumpster Stable. Eight of her career victories have been recorded at Indiana Grand, and it marked the first of the year for the daughter of Mr Mabee, who was bred by Lake Shore Farm.

 

“We’ve been trading places a lot with the other mare (Unbridled Class) and she’s definitely a nice mare (to compete against),” said Contreras. “We kind of planned on this race and running well in it and still hoping she (Expect Indy) was the same horse as last year.”

 

Racing is held Monday through Thursday until Wednesday, Nov. 18. All-Quarter Horse racing is set for Saturday, Oct. 3 and Saturday, Oct. 24. For more information, go to www.indianagrand.com.

Mackey Arena joins list of sports venues to be voting centers

Several sports venues in Indiana will be transformed into voting centers on Election Day. Last month, Marion County announced people will be able to vote inside Lucas Oil Stadium, Bankers Life Fieldhouse and Butler's Hinkle Fieldhouse.

 

Now, if you live in Tippecanoe County, you'll be able to cast your ballot inside Purdue University's Mackey Arena.

 

Purdue and the Tippecanoe County Board of Elections announced Tuesday that the basketball arena will be open for early voting on October 14, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The facility will then, again, be open on November 3 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

 

Mackey Arena will be open for all voters, not just Purdue students and staff. Athletic Director Mike Bobinski says all student-athletes will have November 3 off, so they can go vote.

Colts lose Marlon Mack to torn Achilles

Indianapolis Colts running back Marlon Mack is out for the season, according to NFL Network.

 

Mack left Sunday's game in the first half when he was injured on a play. Monday, an MRI confirmed Mack tore his Achilles and is done for the season.

 

The Colts lost to the Jaguars 27-20, and will host the Minnesota Vikings on Sunday at Lucas Oil Stadium in front of just 2,500 fans.

Jimmie Johnson to IndyCar

At the start of 2020, Jimmie Johnson announced this will be his final season in NASCAR. The 7-time champion made some rumblings in the racing world when he hinted at the idea of switching to IndyCar. In July, Johnson teamed up with Chip Ganassi Racing to do a test on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course. Then, on Wednesday, Johnson made it official in a post on social media -- he will start competing in IndyCar, with Chip Ganassi Racing, in 2021.

 

"When I tested Chip’s Indy car earlier in the year, it only lit the fire more," Johnson said. "I found that I wanted to do it more than ever before. Scott was just incredible to work with and in a short time I found out very quickly why Chip and his teams have won 12 INDYCAR Championships. As part of a natural progression, I wanted to publicly show the alignment with Chip Ganassi Racing to kick the sponsorship program into high gear."

 

The partnership would mean Johnson, one of the most successful drivers in NASCAR history, would become teammates with Dixon, one of the most successful drivers in IndyCar history.

HS Football: Indianapolis Lutheran at Triton Central (Sept 4, 2020)

#1 (1A) Indianapolis Lutheran intercepted #2 (2A) Triton Central in the ednzone in the game's final minute to preserve a 14-7 victory in Indiana Crossroads Conference play.

 

Johnny McCrory and Mark Drake with the call on GIANT fm Sports.

 

Segment 1

Segment 2

Segment 3

Segment 4

 

HS Football: New Castle at Shelbyville (Sept 11, 2020)

New Castle (2-1, 1-1 HHC) defeated Shelbyville (0-4, 0-2 HHC) in a Hoosier Heritage Conference matchup at McKeand Stadium, 55-0.

 

Johnny McCrory and Mark Drake with the call on GIANT fm Sports.

 

Segment 1

 

Segment 2

 

Segment 3

 

Segment 4

 

Triton Central ticket sale format for Week 3 football vs Lutheran

TC Football Ticket Plan for Friday, Sept. 4 vs Lutheran:


Football, Cheer and Band:
You will receive 2 vouchers from your coach that can be turned into the ticket booth with $5 per voucher to get into the game. This ensures that the participants’ parents have “seats”. Please return all unused vouchers to your coach by Friday morning.


Seniors & Juniors:
We will do a pre-sale on tickets in the cafe during both lunch periods on Wednesday-you can buy up to 4 tickets.


Sophomores & Freshmen:
We will do a pre-sale on tickets in the cafe during both lunch periods on Thursday-you can buy up to 2 tickets.


If there are any tickets left, we will pre-sale to both the student body again and to the public on Friday during the hours of 9AM-2PM…PUBLIC-please buzz the High School Main Office and the tickets will be brought out to you.


ALL un-sold tickets will then be for sale at the gate on Friday starting at 6 PM.


TICKETS ARE $5 EACH-checks made out to TC Athletics-thanks for your support and contact Coach Graham with questions… bgraham@nwshelbyschools.org

Pacers announce firing of Nate McMillan

The Indiana Pacers announced Wednesday they have relieved head coach Nate McMillan of his coaching duties.

 

“On behalf of the Simon family and the Pacers organization, I’d like to thank Nate for his years with the team,” said Pacers President of Basketball Operations Kevin Pritchard. “This was a very hard decision for us to make; but we feel it’s in the best interest of the organization to move in a different direction. Nate and I have been through the good times and the bad times; and it was an honor to work with him for those 11 years (in Indiana and Portland).”

 

McMillan took over coaching duties of the Pacers prior to the 2016-17 season; and in his four years with the team he led them to a 183-136 record, including 3-16 in the playoffs. He has an overall coaching record of 661-588, with 17-36 in the playoffs.  McMillan’s 183 wins as head coach of the Pacers is third in the team’s NBA history.

           

The search for a new coach will begin immediately.

HS Football: Greensburg 41, Shelbyville 7 (Aug 21, 2020)

Greensburg quarterback Toby Brogan ran for four touchdowns and threw for another as the Pirates won the season opener at McKeand Stadium, 41-7.

 

Shelbyville's Aidan Tong scored his first varsity touchdown for the Golden Bears.

 

Johnny McCrory and Mark Drake had the call on GIANT fm Sports.

 

Seg 1

Seg 2

Seg 3

Seg 4

Seg 5

 

Marco Andretti wins the pole

For the first time in 33 years, an Andretti will lead the field of the Indianapolis 500 to the green flag on race day.

 

Marco Andretti turned in the fastest four-lap average of the fastest nine drivers in the Fast 9 Shootout on Sunday. His average of 231.068 mph, was only .017 quicker that Scott Dixon’s average of 231.051 mph.

 

 

The last time an Andretti sat on the pole of the Indianapolis 500 was back in 1987 when Marco’s grandfather, Mario Andretti, won the pole.

 

Dixon will start second and Takuma Sato (230.725 mph) will start third on the outside of the front row.

 

 

Marco Andretti’s teammates at Andretti Autosport struggled to replicate the speed that had in round one of qualifying on Saturday.

 

The likes of Ryan Hunter Reay (5th), James Hinchcliffe (6th), and Alexander Rossi (9th), were outpaced by rookie Rinus Veekay, who will start fourth as the only Chevy powered car among the front three rows.

 

Drivers have just one practice session remaining between the end of Sunday and race day on Carb Day, Friday, Aug. 21. Race day is Aug. 23rd.

 

The field will role on on race day as follows:

Row 1: Marco Andretti, Scott Dixon, Takuma Sato

Row 2: Rinus Veekay, Ryan Hunter-Reay, James Hinchcliffe

Row 3: Alex Palou, Graham Rahal, Alexander Rossi

Row 4: Colton Herta, Marcus Ericsson, Spencer Pigot

Row 5: Josef Newgarden, Felix Rosenqvist, Pato O’Ward

Row 6: Ed Carpenter, Zach Veach, Conor Daly

Row 7: Santino Ferrucci, Jack Harvey, Oliver Askew

Row 8: Will Power, Tony Kanaan, Dalton Kellett

Row 9: Simon Pagenaud, Fernando Alonso, James Davison

Row 10: Helio Castroneves, Charlie Kimball, Max Chilton

Row 11: Sage Karam, JR Hildebrand, Ben Hanley

GIANT fm Sports High School Football Preview

GIANT fm Sports Johnny McCrory and Mark Drake take a look at the upcoming high school football season featuring insight and interviews with the Shelbyville Golden Bears and Triton Central Tigers.

 

 

Tuesday's girls golf scoreboard

Greensburg 214, Triton Central 233

TC:  Emma Branham – 52

 

 

Southwestern 225, Edinburgh 244

SW:  Lily Kerber – 50

 

 

New Palestine 226, Greenwood 242

NP:  Megan Diller - 53

Big Ten cancels fall sports

The Big Ten has called off the football season.

 

Commissioner Kevin Warren says there's too much uncertainty about medical risks to play football. The Big Ten had already announced it would cancel all nonconference games, and had built an extra bye week into the schedule to allow flexibility in case of an outbreak.

 

Purdue athletic director Mike Bobinski says he thought the Big Ten had come up with a strong plan for minimizing the risk, but says the last few days of practice made clear how challenging it would be to conduct a season on 14 campuses across 11 states. He says he would have preferred to wait a little longer and give the plan more time to play out, but says he understands and respects the decision.

 

IU athletic director Scott Dolson says he's "heartbroken" to lose the season, but says he's confident it's the right decision.

 

Bobinski says Purdue won't follow Nebraska, which has threatened to bolt the Big Ten for another conference in order to play the season. He's deferring to the conference on how that might affect the Cornhuskers' future membership in the league.

,.

The cancellation covers all fall sports, including soccer, volleyball, cross-country and field hockey. The Big Ten has left open the possibility of playing in the spring instead, but Bobinski says there's been no discussion of how that would work -- everything's been focused on whether and how the fall season might be played. He says those conversations will begin immediately, along with consideration of what happens to sports like basketball which stretch across both semesters.

 

The Big Ten had six teams in the Top 25 in USA Today's preseason coaches' poll, led by second-ranked Ohio State.

 

The Big Ten is the first of the "Power 5" conferences to pull the plug on football. The Mid-American and Mountain West Conferences, as well as the University of Connecticut, had already called off their seasons.

Monday girls golf scoreboard

Greenfield-Central 184, Triton Central 233

TC:  Morgan Shilling with a 52.

 

 

Southwestern 217, Morristown 253

SW:  Lily Kerber – 52

MT:  Hannah Everhart – 60

 

 

Mt. Vernon 178, Lawrence North 209, Beech Grove Inc.

MV:  Alaina Nugent, Meredith Johnson - 40

 

 

New Pal's Hook family dealing with MAC decision to call off fall football

For Matthew Hook, football truly is a way of life.


The New Palestine resident coaches middle school football and his son, Maxen, played a vital role in the New Palestine football team claiming back-to-back Class 5A state titles before heading to the University of Toledo, where he was he was looking to make an impact this fall as a freshman.


For both father and son, Toledo football is on hold as the Mid-America Conference cancelled football this fall amid COVID-19 concerns.


Matthew Hook tells Giant FM he got the call he was hoping he would not receive Saturday morning.
“I got the call Saturday morning from Maxen that the MAC season had been canceled/postponed. He was devastated, probably as despondent as I’ve ever heard him. So immediately I was trying to help him through it. He called a couple hours later, and he was in a better place,” Hook said.


While his son was doing better, dad was anything but.


“I was really upset Sunday. While I understand the decision, it was a very sad day. Fall football is very important to my family,” the elder Hook told Giant FM.


Toledo has had its share of issues with COVID-19 recently, as Rockets head coach Jason Candle announced last month he had tested positive and was asymptomatic.


Despite that, Matthew Hook says he isn’t overly concerned about the disease and his son playing football.


“On a scale of 1-10, I’m a 1. I know the virus is real. I know that people have died, but I do not believe we can control a virus with measures we have taken. It has to run its course,” he said.
Classes at Toledo begin next week, and until then, Maxen will be lifting and continue with conditioning, according to his father.


“Other than that, they don’t really know what the football practice schedule will look like at this time,” Matthew Hook said.


Despite it all, the elder Hook has some fatherly advice for his son.


“Keep your head up. Control what you can control .Focus on the positives. You are at school with free education, room, board, stipend. There’s a lot to be thankful for,” Matthew Hook said.  

Miami takes 4th seed from Pacers with two games to play

T.J. Warren was limited to just 12 points as the Pacers fell to the Heat 114-92 at the NBA bubble in Orlando.

 

Warren was averaging a league-high 34.8 points per game since the restart entering this matchup.

 

Victor Oladipo scored a team-high 14 points for Indiana, which got out-scored by 22 in the second half.

 

The Pacers are fifth in the Eastern Conference at 43-and-28 with two games to play. They'll face the Rockets on Wednesday before meeting the Heat again on Friday.

 

Miami currently sits at the fourth seed in the Eastern Conference.

MAC cancels fall sports

The Mid-American Conference has postponed all scheduled fall contests, including the MAC championships, because of the the coronavirus pandemic. This means the Ball State University will not have fall sports this season.

 

Ball State University President Geoffrey Mearns, said it's important to prioritize the health and safety of student-athletes.

 

"Unlike campus residential and academic settings, the field of competition can limit proper physical distancing and creates conflicts with the use of masks or face coverings," said Mearns. "I respect the advice from our medical experts who have advised that this postponement is currently the safest path forward."

 

Ball State will be looking into bring sports back from the 2021 Spring semester.

Butler, Valpo call off fall football

Another college conference has decided to not play football this fall, affecting two more schools in Indiana.

 

There will not be a football season for the Butler Bulldogs this year. The Pioneer Football League announced the decision Friday morning, citing challenges for team travel across the Midwest, as well as "difficulties meeting state and local health requirements."

 

Valparaiso also plays in the Pioneer Football League.

 

As of now, the only schools in the state planning on playing college football this fall -- out of all levels -- are Notre Dame, IU, Purdue and Ball State.

 

A lot of golfers would love to have the summer that Triton Central's Oliver Gearlds has

Oliver Gearlds is beginning high school practice with his Triton Central teammates hoping for a high school golf season.  The summer he's already put together features quite the resume including being named the Indianapolis Tour Player of the Year, a second-place finish in the Tour Championship and a victory in the Mayor's Cup.

 

The TC sophomore appeared on GIANT fm to talk about the impressive accomplishments he's gained in the sport he's been playing since he was little.

 

 

IHSAA maintains forward progress for fall sports

Even if high school football happens in Indiana on schedule, there will be more logistics to work out. Those logistics are of utmost concern to the new commissioner of the IHSAA Paul Neidig.

 

One of Neidig’s concerns is the number of fans that will attend each game. That has to be taken into account for social distancing and other coronavirus guidelines.

 

“There’s a possibility that there may be a waiver that local health departments can issue if it’s over 250 people and we’re going to be working to provide clarity to our schools on attendance numbers,” said Neidig in an interview with Greg Rakestraw (who was filling in for JMV) on 93.5 and 107.5 The Fan. “There are some interpretation things that we’ve got to get from the state, so we can provide some guidance.”

 

Neidig says working with Governor Eric Holcomb, the Department of Education and the Indiana State Health Department won’t be difficult.

 

“It’s one for all and all for one. If we have a question, we know we can reach out and get that answer. If they have a question of us and how we do things, they know they can reach out and get that answer from us,” said Neidig.

 

An idea that Neidig has heard mentioned by many people is pushing football to the spring and baseball to the fall. Neidig is very concerned about that scenario.

 

“If you take baseball and move it to the fall, kids and families that love baseball would lose two seasons in a row. I also worry about the health and safety aspect of football. If we contest the season in the spring and then let’s say we get done with our state championships in June. Then we would turn right around and start another football season 4-6 short weeks later, I’m not sure that’s best for kids and the safety of the sport,” said Neidig.

 

Given the unpredictability of coronavirus, Neidig understands it’s very possible some teams may play more regular-season games than others, but there will not be a minimum regular-season game requirement to play in the postseason.

 

“If a school is doing everything they can and the cards don’t layout or play their way, we’re going to be very flexible in allowing our member schools to play in our tournament. We have a great thing in this state where it’s an all-in tournament. Everybody that plays, gets to play in that tournament. I certainly am not going to affect that by a school or team falling one or two games short of a ‘minimum’ especially in a time like this,” said Neidig.

 

He says the IHSAA is ready for what he calls “starts and stops” along the way during the season.

“As we get into this fall season, we’re going to have some teams that don’t have any issues at all. We’re going to have some teams that are going to get shut down. At that point, we’ll cancel the contest. We’ll declare it a ‘no contest’ and hope everybody gets healthy and back to play as soon as possible,” says Neidig.

 

Neidig has been with the IHSAA since 2017, as an assistant commissioner, overseeing the sports of cross country, track and field, and boys basketball.

IHSAA maintains forward progress for fall sports

Even if high school football happens in Indiana on schedule, there will be more logistics to work out. Those logistics are of utmost concern to the new commissioner of the IHSAA Paul Neidig.

 

One of Neidig’s concerns is the number of fans that will attend each game. That has to be taken into account for social distancing and other coronavirus guidelines.

 

“There’s a possibility that there may be a waiver that local health departments can issue if it’s over 250 people and we’re going to be working to provide clarity to our schools on attendance numbers,” said Neidig in an interview with Greg Rakestraw (who was filling in for JMV) on 93.5 and 107.5 The Fan. “There are some interpretation things that we’ve got to get from the state, so we can provide some guidance.”

 

Neidig says working with Governor Eric Holcomb, the Department of Education and the Indiana State Health Department won’t be difficult.

 

“It’s one for all and all for one. If we have a question, we know we can reach out and get that answer. If they have a question of us and how we do things, they know they can reach out and get that answer from us,” said Neidig.

 

An idea that Neidig has heard mentioned by many people is pushing football to the spring and baseball to the fall. Neidig is very concerned about that scenario.

 

“If you take baseball and move it to the fall, kids and families that love baseball would lose two seasons in a row. I also worry about the health and safety aspect of football. If we contest the season in the spring and then let’s say we get done with our state championships in June. Then we would turn right around and start another football season 4-6 short weeks later, I’m not sure that’s best for kids and the safety of the sport,” said Neidig.

 

Given the unpredictability of coronavirus, Neidig understands it’s very possible some teams may play more regular-season games than others, but there will not be a minimum regular-season game requirement to play in the postseason.

 

“If a school is doing everything they can and the cards don’t layout or play their way, we’re going to be very flexible in allowing our member schools to play in our tournament. We have a great thing in this state where it’s an all-in tournament. Everybody that plays, gets to play in that tournament. I certainly am not going to affect that by a school or team falling one or two games short of a ‘minimum’ especially in a time like this,” said Neidig.

 

He says the IHSAA is ready for what he calls “starts and stops” along the way during the season.

“As we get into this fall season, we’re going to have some teams that don’t have any issues at all. We’re going to have some teams that are going to get shut down. At that point, we’ll cancel the contest. We’ll declare it a ‘no contest’ and hope everybody gets healthy and back to play as soon as possible,” says Neidig.

 

Neidig has been with the IHSAA since 2017, as an assistant commissioner, overseeing the sports of cross country, track and field, and boys basketball.

Carrizalez juggling school, sports and horses at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino

Most high school students are hitting the snooze button at 7:30 a.m. The time for Eddie “Junior” Carrizalez has a different meaning. The 17-year-old senior at Shelbyville High School is transitioning from work to school at that time, a schedule he has maintained for the past few years at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino.

 

Carrizalez is part of a family immersed in horse racing. His father, Miguel Ramos, is an exercise rider and works on the starting gate during the races and his mother, Sara Donjuan, is a groom for Mike Lauer. Carrizalez works alongside his mother as a groom in the Lauer Stable and currently takes care of six horses. Those under his care include Chipofftheoldblock, Comes N Threes, Sunsign, Jingle, Alternate Nights and Ginormous.

 

“I started going to the barn when I was four, so I’ve been around horses all my life,” said Carrizalez. “I like being around them, and my mom has taught me a lot. I take care of them in the morning, get them ready to go to the track and also get them ready on race days and walk them up to the paddock. It’s worked out for me to be at the barn and still get to school and practices.”

 

Carrizalez is referring to a jam-packed schedule each fall. The three-sport athlete is a member of the varsity soccer team as well as the kicker and punter for the football team at Shelbyville High School. He also runs track in the spring. Participating in both fall sports at the same time can have its challenges, but he has worked out a schedule with the coaches and with Lauer.

 

“Right after school, I go to football practice first and then head over to soccer practice,” said Carrizalez. “The day before a game, I usually stay longer at that practice and will miss the other sport on game days. But otherwise, they are at different times and the games are on different days, so it works out.”

 

Soccer has always been a passion for Carrizalez, a love he shares with his father. He learned the game at an early age and competes in leagues outside of school. He even plays at Indiana Grand’s soccer field on dark days of racing with his father and friends.

 

“I mostly learned soccer on my own,” added Carrizalez. “It’s something that I’ve always liked. My dad is a pretty good soccer player. He and my mom come to a lot of my games when they can.”

 

 

Carrizalez was a major contributor on the team during his junior year. As left wing and midfielder, he is quick and can move the ball to teammates in a flash. Carrizalez scored four goals during the year on a team that has produced college talent over the past few seasons. The team took a devastating blow this past spring when senior Nolan Parker was killed in an automobile accident. His passing has had a major impact on the soccer program at Shelbyville.

 

“Soccer just won’t be the same without Nolan,” said Carrizalez. “Even though he was a senior and was graduating, knowing he’s not there is hard. He was a good leader and a great friend.”

 

Following the loss of Parker, disruptions in school and sports due to COVID set in. Carrizalez had to find other ways to get on the field. Although he still had work at the barn in the mornings, he spent most of his evenings playing soccer.

 

“Junior is a special kid who knows how to balance hard work with having fun,” noted Shelbyville Head Soccer Coach Ben Purvis. “He always has a smile on his face when talking and kicking a ball around with his friends, but as soon as we get into exercises, he becomes focused on getting better. He was a raw talent early in his time with our program and has put in the work to become a regular contributor for our varsity. This spring, even though we weren’t allowed to practice due to COVID, I would drive by the fields and more often than not, see Junior working on different aspects of his game. He has a passion for soccer and drive to improve. I’m really excited to see what his senior year holds.”

 

Football is a newer sport for Carrizalez. He has also developed a passion for it and is showing real promise as the team’s punter and kicker. He caught the eye of Head Coach Mike Clevenger two years ago while kicking soccer balls in the gym and has made the conversion over to the gridiron.

 

“I had Eddie (Carrizalez) in my advanced PE class my first full year at Shelbyville,” explained Clevenger. “One day I come into the gym, and I see him kicking a soccer ball the length of the fieldhouse. I asked him if he would be interested in coming out and kicking for the football team. The next season Eddie came out looking like a kid that has kicked (a football) his whole life. He impressed all of us coaches. He has continued to work every day on his kicking, along with going to soccer practice, working, and school. He has become a great asset for us for football. Through his hard work and perseverance, around half of his kickoffs were touchbacks. We all look forward to Eddie's senior year and what he is able to accomplish." 

 

Carrizalez notes that kicking footballs is different than kicking soccer balls. He uses the front of his foot while kicking in football but in soccer, the side of his foot is utilized to move the ball down the field.

 

“Mr. (Luke) Stout (assistant football coach) really helped polish my kicking (for football),” said Carrizalez. “It wasn’t hard to pick up after the first few times. Punting is harder for me, but I’m learning more all the time.”

 

Carrizalez has not had the opportunity to kick a field goal yet in a game, but he has sailed the ball down the field 65 yards during kickoffs and can consistently kick 40-yard field goals in practice. He’s just waiting for the opportunity to put his skills to use in a game.

 

When school resumes Aug. 5 at Shelbyville High School, Carrizalez will cut back to three horses in the Lauer barn. He will still have time to finish up at the barn by 7:30 a.m. and head to school. Afternoons will be totally focused on football and soccer. As a senior, he’s hopeful to get an offer to continue his love of either sport in the college ranks.

 

 

“Right now, it could be anywhere and I’d be interested just to be able to play in college,” said Carrizalez. “I am hoping for soccer, but football would be great too. I haven’t really thought too much about it. But I’d love to play in college.”

 

Whatever the case may be for Carrizalez’s future, he has placed new meaning in the word dedication. With a proven track record, the sky’s the limit for Carrizalez